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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Could you please name examples and/or send pictures of what 2,000 pounds towing looks like on the Maverick hybrid front wheel drive?
 

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Not sure I understand your question - do you mean what type of trailers you can safely tow? Or what you need to take into account in that 2000 lb max. loaded trailer weight figure from Ford?
 

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Could you please name examples and/or send pictures of what 2,000 pounds towing looks like on the Maverick hybrid front wheel drive?
  1. Two snowmobiles on a trailer.
  2. One/Two jet skis on a trailer.
  3. 17' aluminum fishing boat w/trailer, fuel, gear.
  4. Tear-drop/Lg. Pop-up camper.
  5. One/Two ATV's on a trailer.
  6. Three-four motorcycles on a trailer.
  7. Two heavy duty garden tractors on a trailer.
I could go on and on....
 

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I would think another way of asking that question might be….The hybrid can tow 2,000lb. If the trailer and item(s) contained within weigh 1,700lbs should I be concerned if that would somehow be unsafe to use the Maverick to tow?
Honestly, I am still a bit confused about Tongue weight as it relates to towing things via via the weight of the trailer and its contents. For example this 1,700lbs.
 

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I would think another way of asking that question might be….The hybrid can tow 2,000lb. If the trailer and item(s) contained within weigh 1,700lbs should I be concerned if that would somehow be unsafe to use the Maverick to tow?
Honestly, I am still a bit confused about Tongue weight as it relates to towing things via via the weight of the trailer and its contents
. For example this 1,700lbs.
Shamelessly borrowed from another Maverick forum I posted on:

On every truck forum site I know of, the towing/hauling section is usually a hot-bed of discussions, arguments, options and controversy dominated by some version of the question what can I tow, or can I tow this, or how much trailer can I tow. This post isn’t for seasoned towers/RVer who know the drill, it’s for new-to-towing folks like I was a few years ago who know just enough to be dangerous.

“What can I (safely) tow?” is not a straight-forward question yet for the Maverick. As others here have mentioned, there are a lot of info unknowns pre-production. And the different nomenclature used in towing calcs can get confusing as sometimes different names are given to towing-related terms by different people.

I’m familiar with the main F150 forum. An F150 is VERY different from a Maverick but towing truisms do apply. To roll up some of the general conventional wisdom on this question from thousands of experienced posters:
  • Sadly you can’t always trust truck or trailer salespeople for answers. Most times they know less than you do on towing specifics. Their job is to sell, not verify real capability. You have to do your own homework.
  • Ignore claimed tow ratings (Max. Load Trailer Weights, Max. GCWR) as they’re misleading. The Towing Wars Ford/GM/Ram/etc. wage have really muddied the water for real-world applications. Instead focus on 2 numbers, both found on the driver side door jamb – payload (yellow sticker) and GVWR (white sticker).
  • The main limiting factor that determines how much your truck can tow is probably payload (that yellow sticker).
  • If you are planning on (as opposed to might do) towing anything and then "upgrading" that towed item (small travel trailer, pop-up, utility trailer, etc) then get as much truck as you possibly can afford. For the Maverick that means the 2.0l FWD or AWD with 4K Tow Package.
  • If you are planning on towing, go trailer shopping first, gather all needed data, and then go truck shopping for a properly spec’d vehicle. The truck forums are littered with people that either (a) have an existing trailer/RV they thought they could tow with a soon-to-be purchase truck and then got a rude awakening after picking it up at the dealer and crunching the numbers or (b) bought their truck, ran the numbers on their dream trailer/RV planned for purchase and found they couldn’t get there from here.
  • When buying a truck and trailer, a lot of people make a big mistake by using GCWR as their main buying factor instead of using payload (that yellow sticker). Maximum GCWR is only really useful if you pull trailers that use pintle-type and won’t have any significant tongue weight.
  • If you think you’ll be pushing the envelope tow-wise (near those magic 2000#/4000# numbers), weight your loaded truck and trailer before hitting the road. Yes it’s a pain finding CAT scales or similar but you’ll be happy you did. Remember all those aftermarket things you put on the truck (in general – if it ain’t on the window sticker it’s not accounted for in the yellow sticker), and all that stuff you put in the cabin & bed, and people and pets, and your loaded trailer tongue load? All that weight needs to get whacked off the yellow sticker payload number for your real actual payload number to use for doing your towing sums.
  • Read the Ford Towing Guide (not the prelim. 2022 Guide on this site but the full 2022 Guide that will come out nearer years end that will have Maverick info in it).
  • READ THE OWNERS MANUAL (once it becomes available), it will have a wealth of towing info ranging from “you absolutely must do this” to recommendations and suggestions. And it will have some quirks you may or may not be aware of (planning to tow at high altitudes? Planning on using a trailer over 1500#s total loaded weight? You might be surprised what Ford has to say about that…).
  • Ask advice from experienced towers, check out online references. If you use online “what can I tow” calculators, make sure your inputs are correct. GIGO.
  • Safely towing on the flats or up a hill is one thing, getting it down that hill/mountain or sudden stops is another. From every recent Ford towing guide/owner’s manual I’ve ever seen: “The towing vehicle’s brake system is rated for operation at the GVWR – NOT the GCWR”. Good news – the 2.0l 4K Tow Package comes with integral TBC (trailer brake controller). Possible bad news – the optional receiver hitch on the Hybrid is 4-pin only not 7-pin (does that utility trainer you’re eying or already own even have trailer brakes?).
  • Towing gas mileage – not news to regular towers, but first timers pulling non-pop-up/utility type trailers will not like the 10-12 mpg under load they’ll likely get. You can’t overcome physics.
  • In the real world, people overload their trucks and trailers all the time, it’s human nature, and the truck doesn't blow up. Unless it’s serious overloading they usually get away with it (SAE J2807 does have some flexibility). And there are some recommendations and considerations you’ll probably ignore and be fine. But this new FWD/AWD light-weight unibody mini-truck (under 3800# Base Weight is light) may not be quite as forgiving as heavier RWD/4WD body-on-frame trucks.
  • Did I mention - read and know your yellow and white sticker info.
The Maverick is unibody (not body-on-frame) with 2 engine choices, different types of front/rear suspension, 3 different axle ratios, FWD or AWD. I have no idea what actual GVWR or actual payload capacities they will have until I can see the yellow and white door jamb stickers or get an actual VIN# and check it out online.

Window (Monroney) stickers on F150’s (and Superduties and Transits) show what the GVWR is for that particular truck. Window stickers for Rangers do not show GVWR (I guess because it’s a single 6050# regardless of configuration or trim). Window stickers for all of Ford’s other vehicles do not show GVWR, even if they have a tow package. No window stickers for any Ford vehicle show what the actual payload rating is.

If you have the VIN# for a vehicle you can find additional info using a VIN decoder site (VIN Decoder - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums ). For trucks it shows a range of Base Curb Weight, GVWR, GAWR (front and rear), GCWR, hitch receiver ratings, max. trailer load. I “think” the first number listed in a data string range is the actual vehicle-specific number (it is on my F150) but not 100% sure of that. For most other Ford vehicles (SUV’s, cars) it shows GVWR:TBD.

Actual payload capacity on a specific vehicle is a different story. There is no way I know of to know ahead of time what your unique actual payload capacity number is other than looking at the yellow door jamb sticker.

Some terms/definitions used you’ll run across:
  • Tow Vehicle = your Maverick.
  • Base Curb Weight = weight of tow vehicle including a full tank of gas and all standard equipment. It doesn’t include any passengers, cargo, or any optional equipment that you’ve ordered and had installed from Ford at the factory or ordered and installed yourself. Each trim level (XL, XLT, Lariat) and driveline types (2wd, 4wd or AWD) typically has separate Base Curb Weights, at least it’s that way with F150’s.
  • Actual Curb Weight = weight of tow vehicle plus any installed options, accessories, “stuff” in the cabin and in the bed. When you go to your local CAT scale site to get the real weight of your truck before towing you’ll know this number.
  • Cargo Weight = all applicable tow vehicle payload items (loose cargo or items not permanently installed) excluding people. For towing, whatever trailer tongue weight (TTW) you have is also considered part of Cargo Weight.
  • Maximum Payload Capacity = the payload resulting from GVWR minus Base Curb Weight as manufactured by Ford. You can see that if Base Curb Weight changes for different drivetrain or trim levels, the so-called “Maximum” payload rating will change.
  • Actual Payload Capacity = the combined weight maximum of passengers and cargo (including TTW) when towing. It is the total weight-carrying capacity of the tow vehicle and is on the yellow driver door jamb sticker that says “combined weight of passengers and cargo should never exceed xxxx #s”.
  • GVWR = Gross Vehicle Weight Rating = the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded tow vehicle. It’s on the white driver door jamb sticker. A travel trailer or utility trailer will also have its own GVWR (a sticker somewhere on the frame). This number for a particular tow vehicle or trailer does not change, that value on the white sticker is what it is.
  • GVW = Gross Vehicle Weight = the actual total weight of the tow vehicle and payload. This value can change depending on whatever actual payload you have at the time. The measured GVW must not exceed the GVWR.
  • GAWR (front and rear) = Gross Axle Weight Rating = the maximum amount of weight an axle can carry. It’s also on the white driver door jamb sticker. A trailer will have its own GAWR too.
  • GCWR = Gross Combined Weight Rating = the maximum allowable weight of the tow vehicle and loaded trailer including all cargo and passengers that the tow vehicle can safely handle without risking damage. From Ford Towing Guides.
  • GCW = Gross Combined Weight = the actual total weight of the tow vehicle and loaded trailer. The measured GCW should not exceed the GCWR.
  • Tag-A-Long/Tagalong/small travel trailer/utility trailer etc = a trailer that uses a ball and socket that is attached to the receiver on the back of a vehicle.
  • Fifth Wheel/5th Wheel = This is a trailer that uses a pin and is hitched to a platform in the bed of the truck that centers the weight over the rear axle. Similar to a semi trailer configuration. These are usually very heavy, large trailers that are pulled by 3/4 - 1 ton trucks due to their heavy pin weight, though there are some 1/2 ton trucks and some trailers in this category that can be matched up. N/A for Maverick.
  • Maximum Trailer Weight
  • TTW = Trailer Tongue Weight. The amount of a trailer’s weight that presses down directly on the ball and trailer hitch. This is a payload component on the tow vehicle. Sometimes it’s called Hitch Weight. Ford tells you to assume 10% of loaded trailer weight, real world is between 10%-15%.
  • WDH = Weight Distributing Hitch. This is a type of hitch used to redistribute TTW forward and rearward, and in some cases control sway. These are required for any trailer that exceeds 500 pounds of tongue weight, or for trailers that are prone to sway. As the Maverick is 400#. max. TW with the 4K Tow Package it probably isn’t applicable.
One way to roll this all up: Base Curb Weight + added OEM equipment weight + any aftermarket body and equipment weight + passenger weight + cargo weight (which includes TTW) = GVW; and GVW must not exceed tow vehicle GVWR or axle GAWR’s.

What we think we know about the Maverick from various Ford sources:
  • Base Curb Weight (2.5l FWD Hybrid) = 3674#, Base Curb Weight (2.0l FWD) = 3563#, Base Curb Weight (2.0l AWD) = 3731#.
  • Maximum Payload Capacity = 1500#s (a general number from Ford in various media items for all trims and configurations) – or - maybe 1564#s for a base XL Hybrid (from eSource Book). Regards actual payload ratings, we all won’t know for sure until we can see those yellow stickers. eSource says - “Customers can load Maverick up to its maximum payload rating(2) of 1,564#s. with the 2.5L Hybrid, which is enough capacity to haul 39 bags of mulch at 40#s. each or a small recreational ATV.” (2) “Maximum payload capability is for properly equipped base vehicles with required equipment and a 150#. driver, and varies based on cargo, vehicle configuration, accessories and number of passengers. See label on doorjamb for carrying capacity of a specific vehicle. Payload and towing are independent attributes and may not be achieved simultaneously.”
  • GCWR = from prelim. Tow Guide. 6010# (Hybrid), 5900# (2.0l FWD), 6345# (2.0l AWD), 7900# (2.0l FWD w/4K Tow), 8145# (2.0l AWD w/4K Tow).
  • GVWR (rough calc not actual, need to see the white door sticker) = Base Curb Weight + Payload Capacity. If you assume a ~1500 # payload capacity rating for trims/configurations, then GVWR = 5174 # (Hybrid), 5063 # (2.0l FWD), 5231 # (2.0l AWD).
  • TTW = 400# max (2.0l FWD or AWD w/4K Tow). For the Hybrid, not sure yet but I think it might be 2000#/200#.
Hope we all get more hard info soon. For grins you can plug in numbers to a simple towing calculator like this ( TowCalculator.com ) and see what it spits out for your Maverick and trailer choices.
 

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Shamelessly borrowed from another Maverick forum I posted on:

On every truck forum site I know of, the towing/hauling section is usually a hot-bed of discussions, arguments, options and controversy dominated by some version of the question what can I tow, or can I tow this, or how much trailer can I tow. This post isn’t for seasoned towers/RVer who know the drill, it’s for new-to-towing folks like I was a few years ago who know just enough to be dangerous.

“What can I (safely) tow?” is not a straight-forward question yet for the Maverick. As others here have mentioned, there are a lot of info unknowns pre-production. And the different nomenclature used in towing calcs can get confusing as sometimes different names are given to towing-related terms by different people.

I’m familiar with the main F150 forum. An F150 is VERY different from a Maverick but towing truisms do apply. To roll up some of the general conventional wisdom on this question from thousands of experienced posters:
  • Sadly you can’t always trust truck or trailer salespeople for answers. Most times they know less than you do on towing specifics. Their job is to sell, not verify real capability. You have to do your own homework.
  • Ignore claimed tow ratings (Max. Load Trailer Weights, Max. GCWR) as they’re misleading. The Towing Wars Ford/GM/Ram/etc. wage have really muddied the water for real-world applications. Instead focus on 2 numbers, both found on the driver side door jamb – payload (yellow sticker) and GVWR (white sticker).
  • The main limiting factor that determines how much your truck can tow is probably payload (that yellow sticker).
  • If you are planning on (as opposed to might do) towing anything and then "upgrading" that towed item (small travel trailer, pop-up, utility trailer, etc) then get as much truck as you possibly can afford. For the Maverick that means the 2.0l FWD or AWD with 4K Tow Package.
  • If you are planning on towing, go trailer shopping first, gather all needed data, and then go truck shopping for a properly spec’d vehicle. The truck forums are littered with people that either (a) have an existing trailer/RV they thought they could tow with a soon-to-be purchase truck and then got a rude awakening after picking it up at the dealer and crunching the numbers or (b) bought their truck, ran the numbers on their dream trailer/RV planned for purchase and found they couldn’t get there from here.
  • When buying a truck and trailer, a lot of people make a big mistake by using GCWR as their main buying factor instead of using payload (that yellow sticker). Maximum GCWR is only really useful if you pull trailers that use pintle-type and won’t have any significant tongue weight.
  • If you think you’ll be pushing the envelope tow-wise (near those magic 2000#/4000# numbers), weight your loaded truck and trailer before hitting the road. Yes it’s a pain finding CAT scales or similar but you’ll be happy you did. Remember all those aftermarket things you put on the truck (in general – if it ain’t on the window sticker it’s not accounted for in the yellow sticker), and all that stuff you put in the cabin & bed, and people and pets, and your loaded trailer tongue load? All that weight needs to get whacked off the yellow sticker payload number for your real actual payload number to use for doing your towing sums.
  • Read the Ford Towing Guide (not the prelim. 2022 Guide on this site but the full 2022 Guide that will come out nearer years end that will have Maverick info in it).
  • READ THE OWNERS MANUAL (once it becomes available), it will have a wealth of towing info ranging from “you absolutely must do this” to recommendations and suggestions. And it will have some quirks you may or may not be aware of (planning to tow at high altitudes? Planning on using a trailer over 1500#s total loaded weight? You might be surprised what Ford has to say about that…).
  • Ask advice from experienced towers, check out online references. If you use online “what can I tow” calculators, make sure your inputs are correct. GIGO.
  • Safely towing on the flats or up a hill is one thing, getting it down that hill/mountain or sudden stops is another. From every recent Ford towing guide/owner’s manual I’ve ever seen: “The towing vehicle’s brake system is rated for operation at the GVWR – NOT the GCWR”. Good news – the 2.0l 4K Tow Package comes with integral TBC (trailer brake controller). Possible bad news – the optional receiver hitch on the Hybrid is 4-pin only not 7-pin (does that utility trainer you’re eying or already own even have trailer brakes?).
  • Towing gas mileage – not news to regular towers, but first timers pulling non-pop-up/utility type trailers will not like the 10-12 mpg under load they’ll likely get. You can’t overcome physics.
  • In the real world, people overload their trucks and trailers all the time, it’s human nature, and the truck doesn't blow up. Unless it’s serious overloading they usually get away with it (SAE J2807 does have some flexibility). And there are some recommendations and considerations you’ll probably ignore and be fine. But this new FWD/AWD light-weight unibody mini-truck (under 3800# Base Weight is light) may not be quite as forgiving as heavier RWD/4WD body-on-frame trucks.
  • Did I mention - read and know your yellow and white sticker info.
The Maverick is unibody (not body-on-frame) with 2 engine choices, different types of front/rear suspension, 3 different axle ratios, FWD or AWD. I have no idea what actual GVWR or actual payload capacities they will have until I can see the yellow and white door jamb stickers or get an actual VIN# and check it out online.

Window (Monroney) stickers on F150’s (and Superduties and Transits) show what the GVWR is for that particular truck. Window stickers for Rangers do not show GVWR (I guess because it’s a single 6050# regardless of configuration or trim). Window stickers for all of Ford’s other vehicles do not show GVWR, even if they have a tow package. No window stickers for any Ford vehicle show what the actual payload rating is.

If you have the VIN# for a vehicle you can find additional info using a VIN decoder site (VIN Decoder - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums ). For trucks it shows a range of Base Curb Weight, GVWR, GAWR (front and rear), GCWR, hitch receiver ratings, max. trailer load. I “think” the first number listed in a data string range is the actual vehicle-specific number (it is on my F150) but not 100% sure of that. For most other Ford vehicles (SUV’s, cars) it shows GVWR:TBD.

Actual payload capacity on a specific vehicle is a different story. There is no way I know of to know ahead of time what your unique actual payload capacity number is other than looking at the yellow door jamb sticker.

Some terms/definitions used you’ll run across:
  • Tow Vehicle = your Maverick.
  • Base Curb Weight = weight of tow vehicle including a full tank of gas and all standard equipment. It doesn’t include any passengers, cargo, or any optional equipment that you’ve ordered and had installed from Ford at the factory or ordered and installed yourself. Each trim level (XL, XLT, Lariat) and driveline types (2wd, 4wd or AWD) typically has separate Base Curb Weights, at least it’s that way with F150’s.
  • Actual Curb Weight = weight of tow vehicle plus any installed options, accessories, “stuff” in the cabin and in the bed. When you go to your local CAT scale site to get the real weight of your truck before towing you’ll know this number.
  • Cargo Weight = all applicable tow vehicle payload items (loose cargo or items not permanently installed) excluding people. For towing, whatever trailer tongue weight (TTW) you have is also considered part of Cargo Weight.
  • Maximum Payload Capacity = the payload resulting from GVWR minus Base Curb Weight as manufactured by Ford. You can see that if Base Curb Weight changes for different drivetrain or trim levels, the so-called “Maximum” payload rating will change.
  • Actual Payload Capacity = the combined weight maximum of passengers and cargo (including TTW) when towing. It is the total weight-carrying capacity of the tow vehicle and is on the yellow driver door jamb sticker that says “combined weight of passengers and cargo should never exceed xxxx #s”.
  • GVWR = Gross Vehicle Weight Rating = the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded tow vehicle. It’s on the white driver door jamb sticker. A travel trailer or utility trailer will also have its own GVWR (a sticker somewhere on the frame). This number for a particular tow vehicle or trailer does not change, that value on the white sticker is what it is.
  • GVW = Gross Vehicle Weight = the actual total weight of the tow vehicle and payload. This value can change depending on whatever actual payload you have at the time. The measured GVW must not exceed the GVWR.
  • GAWR (front and rear) = Gross Axle Weight Rating = the maximum amount of weight an axle can carry. It’s also on the white driver door jamb sticker. A trailer will have its own GAWR too.
  • GCWR = Gross Combined Weight Rating = the maximum allowable weight of the tow vehicle and loaded trailer including all cargo and passengers that the tow vehicle can safely handle without risking damage. From Ford Towing Guides.
  • GCW = Gross Combined Weight = the actual total weight of the tow vehicle and loaded trailer. The measured GCW should not exceed the GCWR.
  • Tag-A-Long/Tagalong/small travel trailer/utility trailer etc = a trailer that uses a ball and socket that is attached to the receiver on the back of a vehicle.
  • Fifth Wheel/5th Wheel = This is a trailer that uses a pin and is hitched to a platform in the bed of the truck that centers the weight over the rear axle. Similar to a semi trailer configuration. These are usually very heavy, large trailers that are pulled by 3/4 - 1 ton trucks due to their heavy pin weight, though there are some 1/2 ton trucks and some trailers in this category that can be matched up. N/A for Maverick.
  • Maximum Trailer Weight
  • TTW = Trailer Tongue Weight. The amount of a trailer’s weight that presses down directly on the ball and trailer hitch. This is a payload component on the tow vehicle. Sometimes it’s called Hitch Weight. Ford tells you to assume 10% of loaded trailer weight, real world is between 10%-15%.
  • WDH = Weight Distributing Hitch. This is a type of hitch used to redistribute TTW forward and rearward, and in some cases control sway. These are required for any trailer that exceeds 500 pounds of tongue weight, or for trailers that are prone to sway. As the Maverick is 400#. max. TW with the 4K Tow Package it probably isn’t applicable.
One way to roll this all up: Base Curb Weight + added OEM equipment weight + any aftermarket body and equipment weight + passenger weight + cargo weight (which includes TTW) = GVW; and GVW must not exceed tow vehicle GVWR or axle GAWR’s.

What we think we know about the Maverick from various Ford sources:
  • Base Curb Weight (2.5l FWD Hybrid) = 3674#, Base Curb Weight (2.0l FWD) = 3563#, Base Curb Weight (2.0l AWD) = 3731#.
  • Maximum Payload Capacity = 1500#s (a general number from Ford in various media items for all trims and configurations) – or - maybe 1564#s for a base XL Hybrid (from eSource Book). Regards actual payload ratings, we all won’t know for sure until we can see those yellow stickers. eSource says - “Customers can load Maverick up to its maximum payload rating(2) of 1,564#s. with the 2.5L Hybrid, which is enough capacity to haul 39 bags of mulch at 40#s. each or a small recreational ATV.” (2) “Maximum payload capability is for properly equipped base vehicles with required equipment and a 150#. driver, and varies based on cargo, vehicle configuration, accessories and number of passengers. See label on doorjamb for carrying capacity of a specific vehicle. Payload and towing are independent attributes and may not be achieved simultaneously.”
  • GCWR = from prelim. Tow Guide. 6010# (Hybrid), 5900# (2.0l FWD), 6345# (2.0l AWD), 7900# (2.0l FWD w/4K Tow), 8145# (2.0l AWD w/4K Tow).
  • GVWR (rough calc not actual, need to see the white door sticker) = Base Curb Weight + Payload Capacity. If you assume a ~1500 # payload capacity rating for trims/configurations, then GVWR = 5174 # (Hybrid), 5063 # (2.0l FWD), 5231 # (2.0l AWD).
  • TTW = 400# max (2.0l FWD or AWD w/4K Tow). For the Hybrid, not sure yet but I think it might be 2000#/200#.
Hope we all get more hard info soon. For grins you can plug in numbers to a simple towing calculator like this ( TowCalculator.com ) and see what it spits out for your Maverick and trailer choices.
Wow…thanks for the detailed information. I will wait until later this year to see what info Ford details on the Mav as well regarding towing. Not a need for me that is why I would consider the Hybrid if I ever purchased this truck. My 2020 Toyota Highlander hybrid (4 piston) is supposed to two 3,500lbs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
  1. Two snowmobiles on a trailer.
  2. One/Two jet skis on a trailer.
  3. 17' aluminum fishing boat w/trailer, fuel, gear.
  4. Tear-drop/Lg. Pop-up camper.
  5. One/Two ATV's on a trailer.
  6. Three-four motorcycles on a trailer.
  7. Two heavy duty garden tractors on a trailer.
I could go on and on....
Thank you. This is helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Shamelessly borrowed from another Maverick forum I posted on:

On every truck forum site I know of, the towing/hauling section is usually a hot-bed of discussions, arguments, options and controversy dominated by some version of the question what can I tow, or can I tow this, or how much trailer can I tow. This post isn’t for seasoned towers/RVer who know the drill, it’s for new-to-towing folks like I was a few years ago who know just enough to be dangerous.

“What can I (safely) tow?” is not a straight-forward question yet for the Maverick. As others here have mentioned, there are a lot of info unknowns pre-production. And the different nomenclature used in towing calcs can get confusing as sometimes different names are given to towing-related terms by different people.

I’m familiar with the main F150 forum. An F150 is VERY different from a Maverick but towing truisms do apply. To roll up some of the general conventional wisdom on this question from thousands of experienced posters:
  • Sadly you can’t always trust truck or trailer salespeople for answers. Most times they know less than you do on towing specifics. Their job is to sell, not verify real capability. You have to do your own homework.
  • Ignore claimed tow ratings (Max. Load Trailer Weights, Max. GCWR) as they’re misleading. The Towing Wars Ford/GM/Ram/etc. wage have really muddied the water for real-world applications. Instead focus on 2 numbers, both found on the driver side door jamb – payload (yellow sticker) and GVWR (white sticker).
  • The main limiting factor that determines how much your truck can tow is probably payload (that yellow sticker).
  • If you are planning on (as opposed to might do) towing anything and then "upgrading" that towed item (small travel trailer, pop-up, utility trailer, etc) then get as much truck as you possibly can afford. For the Maverick that means the 2.0l FWD or AWD with 4K Tow Package.
  • If you are planning on towing, go trailer shopping first, gather all needed data, and then go truck shopping for a properly spec’d vehicle. The truck forums are littered with people that either (a) have an existing trailer/RV they thought they could tow with a soon-to-be purchase truck and then got a rude awakening after picking it up at the dealer and crunching the numbers or (b) bought their truck, ran the numbers on their dream trailer/RV planned for purchase and found they couldn’t get there from here.
  • When buying a truck and trailer, a lot of people make a big mistake by using GCWR as their main buying factor instead of using payload (that yellow sticker). Maximum GCWR is only really useful if you pull trailers that use pintle-type and won’t have any significant tongue weight.
  • If you think you’ll be pushing the envelope tow-wise (near those magic 2000#/4000# numbers), weight your loaded truck and trailer before hitting the road. Yes it’s a pain finding CAT scales or similar but you’ll be happy you did. Remember all those aftermarket things you put on the truck (in general – if it ain’t on the window sticker it’s not accounted for in the yellow sticker), and all that stuff you put in the cabin & bed, and people and pets, and your loaded trailer tongue load? All that weight needs to get whacked off the yellow sticker payload number for your real actual payload number to use for doing your towing sums.
  • Read the Ford Towing Guide (not the prelim. 2022 Guide on this site but the full 2022 Guide that will come out nearer years end that will have Maverick info in it).
  • READ THE OWNERS MANUAL (once it becomes available), it will have a wealth of towing info ranging from “you absolutely must do this” to recommendations and suggestions. And it will have some quirks you may or may not be aware of (planning to tow at high altitudes? Planning on using a trailer over 1500#s total loaded weight? You might be surprised what Ford has to say about that…).
  • Ask advice from experienced towers, check out online references. If you use online “what can I tow” calculators, make sure your inputs are correct. GIGO.
  • Safely towing on the flats or up a hill is one thing, getting it down that hill/mountain or sudden stops is another. From every recent Ford towing guide/owner’s manual I’ve ever seen: “The towing vehicle’s brake system is rated for operation at the GVWR – NOT the GCWR”. Good news – the 2.0l 4K Tow Package comes with integral TBC (trailer brake controller). Possible bad news – the optional receiver hitch on the Hybrid is 4-pin only not 7-pin (does that utility trainer you’re eying or already own even have trailer brakes?).
  • Towing gas mileage – not news to regular towers, but first timers pulling non-pop-up/utility type trailers will not like the 10-12 mpg under load they’ll likely get. You can’t overcome physics.
  • In the real world, people overload their trucks and trailers all the time, it’s human nature, and the truck doesn't blow up. Unless it’s serious overloading they usually get away with it (SAE J2807 does have some flexibility). And there are some recommendations and considerations you’ll probably ignore and be fine. But this new FWD/AWD light-weight unibody mini-truck (under 3800# Base Weight is light) may not be quite as forgiving as heavier RWD/4WD body-on-frame trucks.
  • Did I mention - read and know your yellow and white sticker info.
The Maverick is unibody (not body-on-frame) with 2 engine choices, different types of front/rear suspension, 3 different axle ratios, FWD or AWD. I have no idea what actual GVWR or actual payload capacities they will have until I can see the yellow and white door jamb stickers or get an actual VIN# and check it out online.

Window (Monroney) stickers on F150’s (and Superduties and Transits) show what the GVWR is for that particular truck. Window stickers for Rangers do not show GVWR (I guess because it’s a single 6050# regardless of configuration or trim). Window stickers for all of Ford’s other vehicles do not show GVWR, even if they have a tow package. No window stickers for any Ford vehicle show what the actual payload rating is.

If you have the VIN# for a vehicle you can find additional info using a VIN decoder site (VIN Decoder - Ford Truck Enthusiasts Forums ). For trucks it shows a range of Base Curb Weight, GVWR, GAWR (front and rear), GCWR, hitch receiver ratings, max. trailer load. I “think” the first number listed in a data string range is the actual vehicle-specific number (it is on my F150) but not 100% sure of that. For most other Ford vehicles (SUV’s, cars) it shows GVWR:TBD.

Actual payload capacity on a specific vehicle is a different story. There is no way I know of to know ahead of time what your unique actual payload capacity number is other than looking at the yellow door jamb sticker.

Some terms/definitions used you’ll run across:
  • Tow Vehicle = your Maverick.
  • Base Curb Weight = weight of tow vehicle including a full tank of gas and all standard equipment. It doesn’t include any passengers, cargo, or any optional equipment that you’ve ordered and had installed from Ford at the factory or ordered and installed yourself. Each trim level (XL, XLT, Lariat) and driveline types (2wd, 4wd or AWD) typically has separate Base Curb Weights, at least it’s that way with F150’s.
  • Actual Curb Weight = weight of tow vehicle plus any installed options, accessories, “stuff” in the cabin and in the bed. When you go to your local CAT scale site to get the real weight of your truck before towing you’ll know this number.
  • Cargo Weight = all applicable tow vehicle payload items (loose cargo or items not permanently installed) excluding people. For towing, whatever trailer tongue weight (TTW) you have is also considered part of Cargo Weight.
  • Maximum Payload Capacity = the payload resulting from GVWR minus Base Curb Weight as manufactured by Ford. You can see that if Base Curb Weight changes for different drivetrain or trim levels, the so-called “Maximum” payload rating will change.
  • Actual Payload Capacity = the combined weight maximum of passengers and cargo (including TTW) when towing. It is the total weight-carrying capacity of the tow vehicle and is on the yellow driver door jamb sticker that says “combined weight of passengers and cargo should never exceed xxxx #s”.
  • GVWR = Gross Vehicle Weight Rating = the maximum allowable weight of the fully loaded tow vehicle. It’s on the white driver door jamb sticker. A travel trailer or utility trailer will also have its own GVWR (a sticker somewhere on the frame). This number for a particular tow vehicle or trailer does not change, that value on the white sticker is what it is.
  • GVW = Gross Vehicle Weight = the actual total weight of the tow vehicle and payload. This value can change depending on whatever actual payload you have at the time. The measured GVW must not exceed the GVWR.
  • GAWR (front and rear) = Gross Axle Weight Rating = the maximum amount of weight an axle can carry. It’s also on the white driver door jamb sticker. A trailer will have its own GAWR too.
  • GCWR = Gross Combined Weight Rating = the maximum allowable weight of the tow vehicle and loaded trailer including all cargo and passengers that the tow vehicle can safely handle without risking damage. From Ford Towing Guides.
  • GCW = Gross Combined Weight = the actual total weight of the tow vehicle and loaded trailer. The measured GCW should not exceed the GCWR.
  • Tag-A-Long/Tagalong/small travel trailer/utility trailer etc = a trailer that uses a ball and socket that is attached to the receiver on the back of a vehicle.
  • Fifth Wheel/5th Wheel = This is a trailer that uses a pin and is hitched to a platform in the bed of the truck that centers the weight over the rear axle. Similar to a semi trailer configuration. These are usually very heavy, large trailers that are pulled by 3/4 - 1 ton trucks due to their heavy pin weight, though there are some 1/2 ton trucks and some trailers in this category that can be matched up. N/A for Maverick.
  • Maximum Trailer Weight
  • TTW = Trailer Tongue Weight. The amount of a trailer’s weight that presses down directly on the ball and trailer hitch. This is a payload component on the tow vehicle. Sometimes it’s called Hitch Weight. Ford tells you to assume 10% of loaded trailer weight, real world is between 10%-15%.
  • WDH = Weight Distributing Hitch. This is a type of hitch used to redistribute TTW forward and rearward, and in some cases control sway. These are required for any trailer that exceeds 500 pounds of tongue weight, or for trailers that are prone to sway. As the Maverick is 400#. max. TW with the 4K Tow Package it probably isn’t applicable.
One way to roll this all up: Base Curb Weight + added OEM equipment weight + any aftermarket body and equipment weight + passenger weight + cargo weight (which includes TTW) = GVW; and GVW must not exceed tow vehicle GVWR or axle GAWR’s.

What we think we know about the Maverick from various Ford sources:
  • Base Curb Weight (2.5l FWD Hybrid) = 3674#, Base Curb Weight (2.0l FWD) = 3563#, Base Curb Weight (2.0l AWD) = 3731#.
  • Maximum Payload Capacity = 1500#s (a general number from Ford in various media items for all trims and configurations) – or - maybe 1564#s for a base XL Hybrid (from eSource Book). Regards actual payload ratings, we all won’t know for sure until we can see those yellow stickers. eSource says - “Customers can load Maverick up to its maximum payload rating(2) of 1,564#s. with the 2.5L Hybrid, which is enough capacity to haul 39 bags of mulch at 40#s. each or a small recreational ATV.” (2) “Maximum payload capability is for properly equipped base vehicles with required equipment and a 150#. driver, and varies based on cargo, vehicle configuration, accessories and number of passengers. See label on doorjamb for carrying capacity of a specific vehicle. Payload and towing are independent attributes and may not be achieved simultaneously.”
  • GCWR = from prelim. Tow Guide. 6010# (Hybrid), 5900# (2.0l FWD), 6345# (2.0l AWD), 7900# (2.0l FWD w/4K Tow), 8145# (2.0l AWD w/4K Tow).
  • GVWR (rough calc not actual, need to see the white door sticker) = Base Curb Weight + Payload Capacity. If you assume a ~1500 # payload capacity rating for trims/configurations, then GVWR = 5174 # (Hybrid), 5063 # (2.0l FWD), 5231 # (2.0l AWD).
  • TTW = 400# max (2.0l FWD or AWD w/4K Tow). For the Hybrid, not sure yet but I think it might be 2000#/200#.
Hope we all get more hard info soon. For grins you can plug in numbers to a simple towing calculator like this ( TowCalculator.com ) and see what it spits out for your Maverick and trailer choices.
Fantastic info and wisdom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Why don't you just tell us what you want to haul/tow and we can assist you in determining capability. 😏
great suggestions. Not sure on hauling yet. Small loads like has been described. Hay rides trailer, fishing gear, etc.
 

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great suggestions. Not sure on hauling yet. Small loads like has been described. Hay rides trailer, fishing gear, etc.
Should be fine w/o 4K tow then. That said, I think the 4K tow package is a smart purchase even if you don't tow much/heavy because it adds a lot of durability features for short money. 👍
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Should be fine w/o 4K tow then. That said, I think the 4K tow package is a smart purchase even if you don't tow much/heavy because it adds a lot of durability features for short money. 👍
Can you get 4K on the hybrid that I’m getting?
 

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Can you get 4K on the hybrid that I’m getting?
The hybrid can only tow 2k, realistically in all conditions 1,500 pounds. You will need to upgrade to ten Ecoboost and then add the 4K tow package to get 4K towing. I truthfully recommend people upgrade to a bigger truck to tow near the 4K mark. Always better to be over the mark than under. Depending on the grade of incline the towing capacity is less and less. It will be low and slow going up mountains with a heavy trailer.
 

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Some have been built and are awaiting shipment. After that happens it will probably be another 2 to 3 weeks.
 
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