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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm interested in purchasing a base model Maverick, but I understand it will have start/stop technology. I know it can be disabled on other Ford vehicles, but does this vehicle being a hybrid change the ability to disable it? I've driven vehicles with it and I don't like it, so it might be a deal breaker. 🤷‍♀️
 

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Short answer: No way to really disable it because the engine not running a lot of the time is pretty integral to the whole being a hybrid thing.

Longer answer: It doesn't really matter because the vehicle is being put in motion by the ~120 HP electric motor since it's more efficient at low speeds unless it's one of the circumstances where the PCM has the engine still running when stopped (low charge/high load like A/C, HV batt reconditioning cycle, warming catalytic converters, or warming coolant for cabin heat). If at a stop you spike the accelerator with more load than it can meet like because the HV batt is low then it'll start the engine right off as well. But there's also no appreciable lag like on ICE-only start/stop engines where a pinion gear has to move, mesh with the flywheel, and start. The engine is always connected mechanically to the starter/generator motor and it's fairly powerful so starts very quickly.
 

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Both of my parents have priuses, the ICE start stop is random, you really don't notice it stopping, but can feel the difference when it starts. It makes a slight shudder at start up.
The air conditioning compressor is driven by an electric motor, so you won't suddenly begin to broil at a stoplight like a normal auto autostop vehicle
 

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Short answer: No way to really disable it because the engine not running a lot of the time is pretty integral to the whole being a hybrid thing.

Longer answer: It doesn't really matter because the vehicle is being put in motion by the ~120 HP electric motor since it's more efficient at low speeds unless it's one of the circumstances where the PCM has the engine still running when stopped (low charge/high load like A/C, HV batt reconditioning cycle, warming catalytic converters, or warming coolant for cabin heat). If at a stop you spike the accelerator with more load than it can meet like because the HV batt is low then it'll start the engine right off as well. But there's also no appreciable lag like on ICE-only start/stop engines where a pinion gear has to move, mesh with the flywheel, and start. The engine is always connected mechanically to the starter/generator motor and it's fairly powerful so starts very quickly.
Can you speak to the brake regeneration aspect of the vehicle? I despise vehicles that artificially slow down when you let off the accelerator - as if they gear down; I like vehicles to roll on their own inertia when I let off the accelerator.
 

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Ford pretty much has the system tuned to behave for someone familiar with an automatic transmission so it doesn't do the 'one pedal driving' thing some hybrids/EVs do*. The regeneration kicks in most when you are actually braking. It loads the generator circuit which creates drivetrain drag that slows the vehicle and generates power which is fed back into the HV battery. Pushing the brakes harder starts to utilize the hydraulic brakes in addition. There is a very slight amount of regen braking applied if you let off the throttle not unlike the drag of an automatic, but a very slight amount of throttle input and it'll just coast. It'll also use it to maintain cruise control speed on downslopes. Also like an automatic transmission it is programmed to 'creep' at idle in drive.

*I think 'L' on the gear shift selector might do this, but it's not really presented in the owner's manual as something to use all the time.
 

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Also, it is nice to run on battery only plus there is no sound from the engine. I figure Ford, probably required by regulations, will have the truck made a sound when on battery only so people won’t walk out in front of it when driving very slowly. They started doing that on the 2020 Toyota Highlander hybrid. Soft of a George Jetson type sound…a bit weird from the outside though not noticeable too much from inside.
 

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Ford pretty much has the system tuned to behave for someone familiar with an automatic transmission so it doesn't do the 'one pedal driving' thing some hybrids/EVs do*. The regeneration kicks in most when you are actually braking. It loads the generator circuit which creates drivetrain drag that slows the vehicle and generates power which is fed back into the HV battery. Pushing the brakes harder starts to utilize the hydraulic brakes in addition. There is a very slight amount of regen braking applied if you let off the throttle not unlike the drag of an automatic, but a very slight amount of throttle input and it'll just coast. It'll also use it to maintain cruise control speed on downslopes. Also like an automatic transmission it is programmed to 'creep' at idle in drive.

*I think 'L' on the gear shift selector might do this, but it's not really presented in the owner's manual as something to use all the time.
Thank you for your explanation
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I appreciate the detailed information. I'm skeptical about whether I'll like it, but will wait until a test drive to make the final determination.
 

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I appreciate the detailed information. I'm skeptical about whether I'll like it, but will wait until a test drive to make the final determination.
I've driven a Prius since 2008. If the Ford hybrid system design is anything like Toyota's, you don't have to even worry your pretty head about whether your vehicle is charging or not charging or whether your truck is primarily using the battery, the electric motor, or the conventional engine. It just works. You drive like you drive, and the system regenerates from the engine or breaking all the time. I've NEVER had my hybrid battery 'go dead.'

You will have to replace your 12v battery just like you do on every other vehicle though. But by far the biggest impact of owning a hybrid is how annoyed your friends and family will be when you incessantly make comments about your gas mileage.
 

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There are after market OSB plugin's to stop it....Not sure if any current ones will fit or you'll have to wait... I have a Range AFM delete on my Avalanche and it's nice its $199 but the Auto Stop-Start is $125 My wifes Buick Envision has that feature and we hate it...Soon I'll be buying one...
 
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I appreciate the detailed information. I'm skeptical about whether I'll like it, but will wait until a test drive to make the final determination.
Definitely drive just about any full hybrid other than a worn out first gen civic and you'll understand that it is much different than most stop/start systems in how it behaves. It is literally transparent in operation. You don't feel the engine shut off or start at all. All electrical accessories including a/c continue to operate normally.
 

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AGRE
I'm interested in purchasing a base model Maverick, but I understand it will have start/stop technology. I know it can be disabled on other Ford vehicles, but does this vehicle being a hybrid change the ability to disable it? I've driven vehicles with it and I don't like it, so it might be a deal breaker. 🤷‍♀️
[/QUOTE


AGREE!!!
 

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In a hybrid I feel start/stop is an ‘non starter’…sorry could not help myself. It is a non-issue in a hybrid as the engine normally only starts after the truck starts to move under hybrid battery power only. Well, except when you first start it since it has to warm I believe the exhaust system due to emissions control I think.
The benefits of how it works in a hybrid are lots better then an ICE (gas only) engine I feel. At least based on my experiences with a current gen prius and highlander hybrids
 

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In a hybrid I feel start/stop is an ‘non starter’…sorry could not help myself. It is a non-issue in a hybrid as the engine normally only starts after the truck starts to move under hybrid battery power only. Well, except when you first start it since it has to warm I believe the exhaust system due to emissions control I think.
The benefits of how it works in a hybrid are lots better then an ICE (gas only) engine I feel. At least based on my experiences with a current gen prius and highlander hybrids
This is correct. The hybrid system spins up the engine so fast you'd think it was running. The only difference I've noticed with all the hybrids I've owned is early Honda hybrids; they felt terrible when stopping starting. I arroyo hope they have that sorted now, but cannot attest to that. Toyota and Ford hybrids have been very smooth since they started doing hybrids. I still have our 2005 Escape hybrid with over 200,000 miles and you still don't feel the stop/start system unless you really try. In my MKZ hybrid (newer generation) you couldn't feel it at all. I expect the Maverick to be just as good or better, but not sure how you can improve on not feeling anything.

Our Honda Civic hybrid was pretty bad, but I put up with it, it had known issues with the Trans and battery. Our Honda CR-Z was better, but not perfect. Both were bad compared to our Ford hybrids. The Prius I have driven were just as good.

As far as ICE stop start is concerned, I was never really bothered by it until we got my wife's Alfa Romeo Stelvio. That system absolutely sucks!! I now understand why some people are put off by it. If every Stellantis (Chrysler Fiat) is like this, I know why some hate it. All I can say is every Ford I've owned was 100x better than our current Alfa as far as the stop start is concerned, and with a h B bridge system it is 0 concern whatsoever.
Yes, I'm kind of a car junkie and have owned many different vehicles.
 

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This is correct. The hybrid system spins up the engine so fast you'd think it was running. The only difference I've noticed with all the hybrids I've owned is early Honda hybrids; they felt terrible when stopping starting. I arroyo hope they have that sorted now, but cannot attest to that. Toyota and Ford hybrids have been very smooth since they started doing hybrids. I still have our 2005 Escape hybrid with over 200,000 miles and you still don't feel the stop/start system unless you really try. In my MKZ hybrid (newer generation) you couldn't feel it at all. I expect the Maverick to be just as good or better, but not sure how you can improve on not feeling anything.

Our Honda Civic hybrid was pretty bad, but I put up with it, it had known issues with the Trans and battery. Our Honda CR-Z was better, but not perfect. Both were bad compared to our Ford hybrids. The Prius I have driven were just as good.

As far as ICE stop start is concerned, I was never really bothered by it until we got my wife's Alfa Romeo Stelvio. That system absolutely sucks!! I now understand why some people are put off by it. If every Stellantis (Chrysler Fiat) is like this, I know why some hate it. All I can say is every Ford I've owned was 100x better than our current Alfa as far as the stop start is concerned, and with a h B bridge system it is 0 concern whatsoever.
Yes, I'm kind of a car junkie and have owned many different vehicles.
I can add to say my 2019 Honda Insight feels amazing. I have no qualms whatsoever with it's performance.
 

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I can add to say my 2019 Honda Insight feels amazing. I have no qualms whatsoever with it's performance.
Thanks. I would expect as much. My experience was with early models. I just wanted to provide a frame of reference for people trying to relate to something they may have experienced themselves, not trying to denigrate any brand. So thanks for the added insight.
Sorry... I just had to. 😁

So, don't judge every car by what you may have experienced with another brand. They are all unique and different, and improving all the time. If you want to know what you can reasonably expect from the Maverick Hybrid, drive the new Escape Hybrid. The drivetrain is different, but similar enough.
 

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Hybrid: Engine starting and stopping is part of the process. You can't alter that process.

EcoBoost: You can turn the system off but you have to every time you get in the car - cannot be disabled permanently. You can purchase an aftermarket device which will turn it off for you permanently which is available for several other Fords, and will surely be available for this one. Cost range $100 to $200 but well worth it if you hate auto start stop.
 

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I'm interested in purchasing a base model Maverick, but I understand it will have start/stop technology. I know it can be disabled on other Ford vehicles, but does this vehicle being a hybrid change the ability to disable it? I've driven vehicles with it and I don't like it, so it might be a deal breaker. 🤷‍♀️
You're unlikely to notice any difference between start/stop technology and whatever you have now. Why would you want to disable it?
 
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