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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've never owned a Hybrid or driven one.....
When you go out to it...get in and do you turn the key to start like a normal gas engine or do you to it to ON and put it in gear and go??
I mean I guess what I'm asking does it start off with the electric motor or gas??
Dumb question of the day :) lol
 

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I think I heard in a video about a reviewer saying how weird it was for him to turn the key and not hear anything so I think it would start in electric. Can anyone confirm?
 

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I've never owned a Hybrid or driven one.....
When you go out to it...get in and do you turn the key to start like a normal gas engine or do you to it to ON and put it in gear and go??
I mean I guess what I'm asking does it start off with the electric motor or gas??
Dumb question of the day :) lol
Not a dumb question at all. The answer is, it depends.

In my past Ford hybrids, It depends on the battery state at the time of start up. For example, if you had the vehicle running at idle and the battery completely tops off and shuts down the engine and then you turn off the ignition. If started again after a shirt period of time, like running short errands, the car will subsequently 'start' in EV mode; You will not hear the motor run. Put in gear and pull off without the engine. If the battery is slightly discharged, the engine will run as soon as you 'start' the vehicle. There is an indicator that will tell you when the car is "running" in EV mode.

On the last Honda I owned, Honda CR-Z, the car would start any time the shift lever was placed in the 'P' position. I assume for safety. This was snoring as hell... You'd pull up to your parking space in EV mode and place it in park Ave the engine would start only to be shut down immediately. I hated that so much.
I am assuming the Maverick will behave like other Ford hybrids, but as I always say, we will have to wait and see.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I hate phone posting. I need to proof my responses better. Sorry for all the typos.
My cell has the tourette syndrome spell checker
 

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With a hybrid you have to get your head around the start up process as "power on" just like your phone or computer. When you turn the key or press the start button (whichever it has), a light comes on the dash that says "READY". That is your cue to put it in gear and go. In the "power on" process the gasoline engine may or may not fire up, that's up to the computer based on a number of variables.

Once you are underway, the computer is constantly orchestrating whether to use the gas engine or electric motors or both. Thus at times you will be under power from the gas engine only, the electric motor only or both- sometimes neither if coasting.

Things like the AC will blow cold and work regardless of whether the gasoline engine starts up or is running because hybrids have an electric heat-pump type of system not dependent on an engine driven compressor. Usually, the only reason the gasoline engine will start up immediately when you "power on" your car is if the hybrid battery is low or the exterior temperatures are at an extreme that requires high load HVAC use.
 

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With a hybrid you have to get your head around the start up process as "power on" just like your phone or computer. When you turn the key or press the start button (whichever it has), a light comes on the dash that says "READY". That is your cue to put it in gear and go. In the "power on" process the gasoline engine may or may not fire up, that's up to the computer based on a number of variables.

Once you are underway, the computer is constantly orchestrating whether to use the gas engine or electric motors or both. Thus at times you will be under power from the gas engine only, the electric motor only or both- sometimes neither if coasting.

Things like the AC will blow cold and work regardless of whether the gasoline engine starts up or is running because hybrids have an electric heat-pump type of system not dependent on an engine driven compressor. Usually, the only reason the gasoline engine will start up immediately when you "power on" your car is if the hybrid battery is low or the exterior temperatures are at an extreme that requires high load HVAC use.
Just wanted to correct a couple of things here. I realize you probably just misspoke but I don't want anyone to be confused, though I'm probably adding more confusion.
First, I don't know what specific equipment the Maverick has but can make some guesses based on previous Ford products and info which has been shared previously. Some of that info may prove to be incorrect.
The Maverick will likely have a conventional style A/C and heating system for the passenger compartment, with a couple exceptions from other lower prices Fords. It will not have a heat pump, a system used mostly on small diesels and only for heat since the engine generates little heart at idle. Jeep liberty diesel comes to mind. Anyway...
It will have a conventional A/C compressor but driven by electricity, not a heat pump type system. It's a regular old compressor, except variable and electricity driven. It may be driven by either the engine or electricity as those do exist (ecu decides which drive to use, electric or engine based on inputs yada yada) but I'm guessing on this application Ford will go the cheaper route and it will be strictly electric.
It will also probably have an electric pump which continues to circulate engine coolant through the otherwise conventional heating system when the engine is off. In very cold temperatures the system commands the engine to run based on coolant temp, which will be one reason your hybrid economy really sucks in winter. It may have an actual electric heat pump to maintain temperature, but those things take a lot of power to run, so I'm guessing Ford went the cheaper route and will simply use the efficient Atkinson cycle engine for heat.

But as always, Ford may surprise us and use some totally different new thing. We'll just have to get our hands on it to see.
 

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Just wanted to correct a couple of things here. I realize you probably just misspoke but I don't want anyone to be confused, though I'm probably adding more confusion.
First, I don't know what specific equipment the Maverick has but can make some guesses based on previous Ford products and info which has been shared previously. Some of that info may prove to be incorrect.
The Maverick will likely have a conventional style A/C and heating system for the passenger compartment, with a couple exceptions from other lower prices Fords. It will not have a heat pump, a system used mostly on small diesels and only for heat since the engine generates little heart at idle. Jeep liberty diesel comes to mind. Anyway...
It will have a conventional A/C compressor but driven by electricity, not a heat pump type system. It's a regular old compressor, except variable and electricity driven. It may be driven by either the engine or electricity as those do exist (ecu decides which drive to use, electric or engine based on inputs yada yada) but I'm guessing on this application Ford will go the cheaper route and it will be strictly electric.
It will also probably have an electric pump which continues to circulate engine coolant through the otherwise conventional heating system when the engine is off. In very cold temperatures the system commands the engine to run based on coolant temp, which will be one reason your hybrid economy really sucks in winter. It may have an actual electric heat pump to maintain temperature, but those things take a lot of power to run, so I'm guessing Ford went the cheaper route and will simply use the efficient Atkinson cycle engine for heat.

But as always, Ford may surprise us and use some totally different new thing. We'll just have to get our hands on it to see.
Whichever the case, the AC still blows cold and works regardless of whether the engine is running or not. That was the operational point made.
 

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Whichever the case, the AC still blows cold and works regardless of whether the engine is running or not. That was the operational point made.
Not trying to offend. The question seemed to be also about the operation of hybrids in general, so I'm just trying to present as much info as I can. And again... I cannot say for certain how the Maverick will behave.

Regarding A/C... True, on newer systems. This was not always the case. If someone buys a used hybrid as opposed to the new Maverick to dip their toe in the Hybrid pool, they may find the A/C stops operating at idle unless the controls are turned to "Max A/C", depending on year and model of course.
The Maverick is generating a lot of interest in first time hybrid buyers and I'm sure not all of them will buy Mavericks, so more info is better.
 

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I've never owned a Hybrid or driven one.....
When you go out to it...get in and do you turn the key to start like a normal gas engine or do you to it to ON and put it in gear and go??
I mean I guess what I'm asking does it start off with the electric motor or gas??
Dumb question of the day :) lol
With our various Prii in the family - yes, the plural of Prius is Prii 😶 - the vehicle makes no engine noise when it starts. The dash lights and displays come on, and you shift into D or R and go. Oddly, I got used to it really fast on the cars with push button start, but it was always weird on my husband's 'turn the key and nothing happens.'
 

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The Maverick also has a heat exchanger on the exhaust to help scavenge additional waste heat in addition to heat from the engine block.
 

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On the last Honda I owned, Honda CR-Z, the car would start any time the shift lever was placed in the 'P' position. I assume for safety.
Yeah, I'd guess it was to help keep folks from accidentally leaving it on in the garage, only to have it start up later on to recharge itself. I've heard a few people lost their lives that way, from CO poisoning. I hope the Maverick has some sort of "strong reminder" not to do that.
 

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I'm guessing that you just turn the key to the engine on setting. I bet there is no extra spring loaded "start" position but I could be wrong.
 

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I'm guessing that you just turn the key to the engine on setting. I bet there is no extra spring loaded "start" position but I could be wrong.
Past/current Fords still feel like a traditional ignition key switch, spring and all to start. In function it's really just a switch, it will continue the start sequence whether you hold it in that position or not.
The lariat with push button, it's just the fact that everything in the cluster comes alive with a ready light. It does give you a pretty good warning if you try to leave with the car on and key in pocket.
For xl and XLT.... Don't leave the car with the key in the ignition. Problem solved.
 

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The Maverick also has a heat exchanger on the exhaust to help scavenge additional waste heat in addition to heat from the engine block.
Can you give me a part number for that? Id like to research that since I'm unfamiliar with it. Thanks!
 

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Can you give me a part number for that? Id like to research that since I'm unfamiliar with it. Thanks!
Not sure if the Escape Hybrid (edit: looks like 2021 added it) has it but the Explorer Hybrid does. Toyota has been using a similar setup on the Prius for a while now. On the Maverick hybrid powertrain render you can see the assembly mounted adjacent to the HVB.
 

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Not sure if the Escape Hybrid (edit: looks like 2021 added it) has it but the Explorer Hybrid does. Toyota has been using a similar setup on the Prius for a while now. On the Maverick hybrid powertrain render you can see the assembly mounted adjacent to the HVB.
Does this heat cabin air or strictly for battery temp control on extremely cold days?
 

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Does this heat cabin air or strictly for battery temp control on extremely cold days?
Got home and did a little more research myself. Thanks for turning me on to that.
It helps heat the engine coolant. Simply put it warms up the "coolant" faster and retains more heat, which helps all system which use heated engine fluids. Simple, efficient. Toyota had indeed been using a similar setup for a while.
Will be interesting to see just how it might be used in Maverick or if it makes production; from what I read, Ford only previously used on plug-in hybrid models? Not sure if that was accurate.
 

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I've never owned a Hybrid or driven one.....
When you go out to it...get in and do you turn the key to start like a normal gas engine or do you to it to ON and put it in gear and go??
I mean I guess what I'm asking does it start off with the electric motor or gas??
Dumb question of the day :) lol
I don’t know anything about hybrids either. I would like to know how the battery performs in extreme heat. I live in Phoenix area and regular car batteries die in just a few years max. I generally keep vehicles at least 10 yrs and don’t want to have to replace the battery or not be able to sell it because battery is about to die.
 

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Got home and did a little more research myself. Thanks for turning me on to that.
It helps heat the engine coolant. Simply put it warms up the "coolant" faster and retains more heat, which helps all system which use heated engine fluids. Simple, efficient. Toyota had indeed been using a similar setup for a while.
Will be interesting to see just how it might be used in Maverick or if it makes production; from what I read, Ford only previously used on plug-in hybrid models? Not sure if that was accurate.
Nice work. This device (Ford's version of it) can be seen in their marketing materials....
1129
 
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