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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in a more rural area where daily commute to work will not have alot of stop and gos...besides what driving is done into town vs city commute..the hybrid price of over 1000 cheaper than eco price definitely is a plus..but is it best choice in the long run....as far as getting best of what a hybrid is made for
 

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I live in a more rural area where daily commute to work will not have alot of stop and gos...besides what driving is done into town vs city commute..the hybrid price of over 1000 cheaper than eco price definitely is a plus..but is it best choice in the long run....as far as getting best of what a hybrid is made for
I have the same situation- living in a rural area and commute to work without stop and go driving (50 miles each way).
I bought a 2020 Escape Hybrid a year ago and have been astonished with the MPG in town /city driving, and happy with my commute's MPG. I now have 28k on the Escape. If I drive the interstate to work and back, I get a little better mpg than my 2008 Focus did with a much more comfortable ride in a bigger /heavier vehicle (in KS, the interstate speed limit is 75). If I drive a highway route (65 mph, with some drops to 45 / 30 going through a few towns for very short distances -maybe a mile each time, x's 3 towns), I am getting about 5-8 mpg better than my 2008 Focus did. In town driving, to the grocery store for example, I get 50+ mpg in the Escape hybrid, where I would get 13-18 in the Focus (a lot of traffic lights).
 

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Hybrid drivetrains are much more refined than their ICE counterparts. Smoother and better power delivery. We live in a rural area so hybrid wasn't a big advantage for us but after driving both versions it was an easy choice.
 

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Hybrid drivetrains are much more refined than their ICE counterparts. Smoother and better power delivery. We live in a rural area so hybrid wasn't a big advantage for us but after driving both versions it was an easy choice.
Totally agree with you. Add to that, having the A/C or heated seats on, sitting at traffic liights or waiting for my wife to come out of a store, without the engine on constantly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have the same situation- living in a rural area and commute to work without stop and go driving (50 miles each way).
I bought a 2020 Escape Hybrid a year ago and have been astonished with the MPG in town /city driving, and happy with my commute's MPG. I now have 28k on the Escape. If I drive the interstate to work and back, I get a little better mpg than my 2008 Focus did with a much more comfortable ride in a bigger /heavier vehicle (in KS, the interstate speed limit is 75). If I drive a highway route (65 mph, with some drops to 45 / 30 going through a few towns for very short distances -maybe a mile each time, x's 3 towns), I am getting about 5-8 mpg better than my 2008 Focus did. In town driving, to the grocery store for example, I get 50+ mpg in the Escape hybrid, where I would get 13-18 in the Focus (a lot of traffic lights).
How did you see price on escape hybrid vs gas only? I think the hybrid maverick being a lot cheaper than eco is gonna get lot people like myself to try a hybrid...I think ford has developed a good transmission for the mav .. still wonder how they figured on what set up for the gear ratio etc since this will be used as a truck for some and can have some bigger payloads at times vs just a escape for commutes....long distance maintenance I wonder what repair cost could be since everything is electric ...no starter...no alternator...no belts replace....just hope if few more years it will only be maybe 500 for a battery....
 

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I live in a more rural area where daily commute to work will not have alot of stop and gos...besides what driving is done into town vs city commute..the hybrid price of over 1000 cheaper than eco price definitely is a plus..but is it best choice in the long run....as far as getting best of what a hybrid is made for
Although your commute doesn't take advantage of the Hybrid powertrain most notable feature, city MPG, that doesn't mean it still isn't a good choice. Normally hybrid meant thousands in premium to get the option on the car and you had to earn it back through gas savings but that's no longer the case. Even if u only make use of the Maverick's lower 34mpg (est) on the highway that is still the Maverick's highest highway MPG and like u mentioned you didn't have to spend the extra 1k for the eco. Other hybrid plus like idling with the AC + inverter on while using the least amount of fuel or if short enough no gas at all is nice when going thru drivetru, ferries or just waiting for some one/thing parked and reduced brake wear among other small plus here and there still make it a solid choice.
 

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I like power (especially the tuneability of the EcoBoost turbo engine), but the hybrid and its gas savings are where it's at for me. We have a 2013 C-Max Hybrid now, and love it, but I'm constantly wishing for a larger platform and some open air cargo capacity. I'm headed to the dealership tomorrow to look at the Mav and may get one if things work out. X-Plan pricing of course!
 

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I've done over 100k of rural and interstate highway travel on my 2016 Fusion Hybrid, and its still great on the highway. You still get great fuel economy, and the benefits of AC with the engine off, quieter operation, and smoother NVH. Ecoboost is great if you want power and towing, but if all you do is daily drive, hybrid is a great way to go.
 

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It would've been my choice if they found a way to include AWD. Once they figure it out I may find myself trading the MY22 in for a MY25? AWD Hybrid, heck I'd even deal with an electric motor to add supplemental power to rear wheels like Toyota does instead of having drive shaft.
 

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Maybe some of you Brainiac's can solve for N/A without variables like aerodynamics ,tires, slight transmission differences etc.... Found on another forum - not my numbers.


  • Prius C :
    • Weight = 2,500 lbs, Battery Capacity = 0.9 Kwh, EPA = 53 city / 46 hwy
  • Gen3 Prius Liftback :
    • Weight = 3,042 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 51 city / 48 hwy
  • Prius V :
    • Weight = 3,274 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 44 city / 40 hwy
  • Ford Maverick Hybrid :
    • Weight = 3,674+ lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.1 Kwh, EPA = N/A


This will give you something to debate - Is Ford close enough to the 40 city EPA as they claim.
 

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Maybe some of you Brainiac's can solve for N/A without variables like aerodynamics ,tires, slight transmission differences etc.... Found on another forum - not my numbers.


  • Prius C :
    • Weight = 2,500 lbs, Battery Capacity = 0.9 Kwh, EPA = 53 city / 46 hwy
  • Gen3 Prius Liftback :
    • Weight = 3,042 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 51 city / 48 hwy
  • Prius V :
    • Weight = 3,274 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 44 city / 40 hwy
  • Ford Maverick Hybrid :
    • Weight = 3,674+ lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.1 Kwh, EPA = N/A


This will give you something to debate - Is Ford close enough to the 40 city EPA as they claim.
I'm not all that knowledgeable on hybrid powertrains, but I believe the type of motor being powered is also a huge factor in determining MPG figures.
I can't seem to find a good comparison between the powertrain in my C-Max Hybrid and the new Mav Hybrid, so can only guess at this point, but some youtube vids give me hope this new Mav powertrain is very efficient netting 50-60 mpg in town with hypermiling techniques.
 

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I'm not all that knowledgeable on hybrid powertrains, but I believe the type of motor being powered is also a huge factor in determining MPG figures.
I can't seem to find a good comparison between the powertrain in my C-Max Hybrid and the new Mav Hybrid, so can only guess at this point, but some youtube vids give me hope this new Mav powertrain is very efficient netting 50-60 mpg in town with hypermiling techniques.
I read a article several months ago the new electric motor gained 1% greater efficiency over the previous design. The internal combustion engine may be more efficient also. Just a fun problem to solve. The EPA will give us the real numbers before the end of the year. ;)
 

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I read a article several months ago the new electric motor gained 1% greater efficiency over the previous design. The internal combustion engine may be more efficient also. Just a fun problem to solve. The EPA will give us the real numbers before the end of the year. ;)
I would expect a greater gain since the HF45 is now modeled like the Tesla motor, and thus improved from the HF35 from what I read.
I really wonder if that's all the improvement it enables though.
Consider that the Mav's 1.1kwh battery pack is smaller than my C-Max Hybrid's 1.4kwh pack, yet it appears to get similar mileage even with its much more boxy dimensions, so the similar mileage (based on some youtube reviews anyway) must be due to something I'm not quite understanding.
 

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I would expect a greater gain since the HF45 is now modeled like the Tesla motor, and thus improved from the HF35 from what I read.
I really wonder if that's all the improvement it enables though.
Consider that the Mav's 1.1kwh battery pack is smaller than my C-Max Hybrid's 1.4kwh pack, yet it appears to get similar mileage even with its much more boxy dimensions, so the similar mileage (based on some youtube reviews anyway) must be due to something I'm not quite understanding.
A nice article in Outdoor Life on the Maverick

Truck Review: Ford's New Mid-Sized Maverick | Outdoor Life
 

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Maybe some of you Brainiac's can solve for N/A without variables like aerodynamics ,tires, slight transmission differences etc.... Found on another forum - not my numbers.


  • Prius C :
    • Weight = 2,500 lbs, Battery Capacity = 0.9 Kwh, EPA = 53 city / 46 hwy
  • Gen3 Prius Liftback :
    • Weight = 3,042 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 51 city / 48 hwy
  • Prius V :
    • Weight = 3,274 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 44 city / 40 hwy
  • Ford Maverick Hybrid :
    • Weight = 3,674+ lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.1 Kwh, EPA = N/A


This will give you something to debate - Is Ford close enough to the 40 city EPA as they claim.
I'm no hybrid battery expert, but I drive a generation 4 Prius with a 0.75 kWh lithium ion battery pack, which is significantly smaller than the nickel-metal hydride one in the generation 3. My gas mileage is consistently in the 52.4 to 52.6 range. I believe that the Maverick with its larger lithium ion battery design will be slightly better than the advertised 40 mpg projection.
 

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From the article:
"Then there’s the fuel economy. During an hour-long drive through downtown Nashville and into the rural county roads, I averaged 52 miles per gallon on the dot."

Sweet jeebus, that sounds good to me, if it's correct and he didn't go all-out on the hypermiling techniques.
I doubt the author hypermiled, as it's an outdoorlife.com article, and not exactly what I'd consider a mecca of hybrid vehicle testing, though he likely used that Eco Mode like below.
Whatever Ford has improved upon, it's far more than what we currently know.

Here's another article talking about Ford's Communications Director Mike Levine getting 50 MPG.

To further hijack the thread, here's another article that discusses some hypermiling and using Eco Mode:
"The hybrid’s electric power provides a smooth, strong stream of power. Driving as I usually do returns fuel economy of 35 mpg in mixed driving. Placing it in Eco mode and practicing hypermiling saw the Maverick return a stunning 51 mpg."
https://www.normantranscript.com/re...cle_99023500-1783-5451-bf08-ecaa581a2f09.html
 

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The Ford Escape H appears to be the closest vehicle in size, powertrain(same engine) and weight for fuel economy comparisons. Since the Escape is rated @ 41mpg comb. I expect Maverick will be very close to it. While battery packs provide motive power at low speeds and auxiliary power while stopped it's primary purpose is to assist the ICE in running at its most efficient RPM by storing power when engine load is low or vehicle is braking and releasing it when extra power is needed such as acceleration or ascending hills. While it is interesting to observe how fast or far vehicle can go on battery power alone, eventually this power has to be recovered by running the ICE. Batteries are sized based on packaging limitations, cost, and performance requirements. While a bigger battery may provide more speed or distance it may not increase MPG. This is where plug in hybrids step in.
 

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The Ford Escape H appears to be the closest vehicle in size, powertrain(same engine) and weight for fuel economy comparisons. Since the Escape is rated @ 41mpg comb. I expect Maverick will be very close to it. While battery packs provide motive power at low speeds and auxiliary power while stopped it's primary purpose is to assist the ICE in running at its most efficient RPM by storing power when engine load is low or vehicle is braking and releasing it when extra power is needed such as acceleration or ascending hills. While it is interesting to observe how fast or far vehicle can go on battery power alone, eventually this power has to be recovered by running the ICE. Batteries are sized based on packaging limitations, cost, and performance requirements. While a bigger battery may provide more speed or distance it may not increase MPG. This is where plug in hybrids step in.
Totally agree on that, and I'm guessing the majority of the ~50 mpg figures I'm reading are with Eco Mode and employing some good techniques, so should be easily attainable.
My 2013 C-Max Hybrid lacks that mode so I'll be curious to see how the Mav drives in that mode compared my CMH.
I regularly get ~46 city mpg in normal weather in my CMH, ~10% above the 42 city mpg it's rated at.
 

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When I was building my Escape (using the Ford website, not actually building it), they had a Titanium and a Titanium Hybrid model, so I compared the two. I agree that that with the “base” model being a hybrid, more people are going to check out that option, and it will be a lot of customer’s first hybrid. Check out this article from MotorTrend regarding the engine /transmission: 2022 Ford Maverick: Why There’s No AWD Hybrid Version—Yet
 

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When I was building my Escape (using the Ford website, not actually building it), they had a Titanium and a Titanium Hybrid model, so I compared the two. I agree that that with the “base” model being a hybrid, more people are going to check out that option, and it will be a lot of customer’s first hybrid. Check out this article from MotorTrend regarding the engine /transmission: 2022 Ford Maverick: Why There’s No AWD Hybrid Version—Yet
Expect there will be an AWD H in the future as the Maverick gains popularity and hopefully it will be in the form of a separate electric rear drive motor thus eliminating transfer case, clutch and drive shaft as Toyota does.
 
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