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I like power (especially the tuneability of the EcoBoost turbo engine), but the hybrid and its gas savings are where it's at for me. We have a 2013 C-Max Hybrid now, and love it, but I'm constantly wishing for a larger platform and some open air cargo capacity. I'm headed to the dealership tomorrow to look at the Mav and may get one if things work out. X-Plan pricing of course!
 

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Maybe some of you Brainiac's can solve for N/A without variables like aerodynamics ,tires, slight transmission differences etc.... Found on another forum - not my numbers.


  • Prius C :
    • Weight = 2,500 lbs, Battery Capacity = 0.9 Kwh, EPA = 53 city / 46 hwy
  • Gen3 Prius Liftback :
    • Weight = 3,042 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 51 city / 48 hwy
  • Prius V :
    • Weight = 3,274 lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.3 Kwh, EPA = 44 city / 40 hwy
  • Ford Maverick Hybrid :
    • Weight = 3,674+ lbs, Battery Capacity = 1.1 Kwh, EPA = N/A


This will give you something to debate - Is Ford close enough to the 40 city EPA as they claim.
I'm not all that knowledgeable on hybrid powertrains, but I believe the type of motor being powered is also a huge factor in determining MPG figures.
I can't seem to find a good comparison between the powertrain in my C-Max Hybrid and the new Mav Hybrid, so can only guess at this point, but some youtube vids give me hope this new Mav powertrain is very efficient netting 50-60 mpg in town with hypermiling techniques.
 

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I read a article several months ago the new electric motor gained 1% greater efficiency over the previous design. The internal combustion engine may be more efficient also. Just a fun problem to solve. The EPA will give us the real numbers before the end of the year. ;)
I would expect a greater gain since the HF45 is now modeled like the Tesla motor, and thus improved from the HF35 from what I read.
I really wonder if that's all the improvement it enables though.
Consider that the Mav's 1.1kwh battery pack is smaller than my C-Max Hybrid's 1.4kwh pack, yet it appears to get similar mileage even with its much more boxy dimensions, so the similar mileage (based on some youtube reviews anyway) must be due to something I'm not quite understanding.
 

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From the article:
"Then there’s the fuel economy. During an hour-long drive through downtown Nashville and into the rural county roads, I averaged 52 miles per gallon on the dot."

Sweet jeebus, that sounds good to me, if it's correct and he didn't go all-out on the hypermiling techniques.
I doubt the author hypermiled, as it's an outdoorlife.com article, and not exactly what I'd consider a mecca of hybrid vehicle testing, though he likely used that Eco Mode like below.
Whatever Ford has improved upon, it's far more than what we currently know.

Here's another article talking about Ford's Communications Director Mike Levine getting 50 MPG.

To further hijack the thread, here's another article that discusses some hypermiling and using Eco Mode:
"The hybrid’s electric power provides a smooth, strong stream of power. Driving as I usually do returns fuel economy of 35 mpg in mixed driving. Placing it in Eco mode and practicing hypermiling saw the Maverick return a stunning 51 mpg."
https://www.normantranscript.com/re...cle_99023500-1783-5451-bf08-ecaa581a2f09.html
 

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The Ford Escape H appears to be the closest vehicle in size, powertrain(same engine) and weight for fuel economy comparisons. Since the Escape is rated @ 41mpg comb. I expect Maverick will be very close to it. While battery packs provide motive power at low speeds and auxiliary power while stopped it's primary purpose is to assist the ICE in running at its most efficient RPM by storing power when engine load is low or vehicle is braking and releasing it when extra power is needed such as acceleration or ascending hills. While it is interesting to observe how fast or far vehicle can go on battery power alone, eventually this power has to be recovered by running the ICE. Batteries are sized based on packaging limitations, cost, and performance requirements. While a bigger battery may provide more speed or distance it may not increase MPG. This is where plug in hybrids step in.
Totally agree on that, and I'm guessing the majority of the ~50 mpg figures I'm reading are with Eco Mode and employing some good techniques, so should be easily attainable.
My 2013 C-Max Hybrid lacks that mode so I'll be curious to see how the Mav drives in that mode compared my CMH.
I regularly get ~46 city mpg in normal weather in my CMH, ~10% above the 42 city mpg it's rated at.
 
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