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Never owned a hybrid so I’m very much looking forward to the estimated 40mpg city as that is the bulk of my driving? Also have a never owned a hybrid how closely do the real life numbers match up with the estimates?
 

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Never owned a hybrid so I’m very much looking forward to the estimated 40mpg city as that is the bulk of my driving? Also have a never owned a hybrid how closely do the real life numbers match up with the estimates?
It does sit higher than a car, so those numbers are probably pretty good for average users. Being a "truck" body will bring it below regular hybrids that get 40-50+

My Honda Insight is rated at 52/50 (city/hwy) and I regularly exceed that (60+ some days). Then again, I'm a very light driver as I'm trying to maximize efficiency. I also rock my insurance companies tracker, so it saves on insurance as well as gas.


The low 30s for highway is probably spot on too, because as I said in the first paragraph, it sits higher. That means it's going to be much less aerodynamic than a car, so you will have substantially more drag.
 

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The 2020 and 2021 Escape use a variant of the Mask engine and transmission and is on the same C2 platform. This link shows what those hybrid owners are getting in the real world.

The Maverick will likely be a little bit less because aerodynamics and extra weight, but it gives you a o into the drivetrain performance at least.
 

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Never owned a hybrid so I’m very much looking forward to the estimated 40mpg city as that is the bulk of my driving? Also have a never owned a hybrid how closely do the real life numbers match up with the estimates?

I have noticed Ford always states “up to 40 mpg’s”…..,not yet have I heard them say it WILL average 40 on a regular basis. So I am expecting to get about 37-ish city….maybe 40 mpg with no A/C, heater, heated seats, etc. Will just have to wait. When I bought my 2017 Niro it stated on the window sticker 49/51 and 50 combined and that is exactly what I average and sometime more …..up to 52-54 city but usually 51 freeway. I will really miss this when I sell it and begin driving the Maverick. I go so long between fill ups I never can remember last time!
 

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I'm not familiar with Ford hybrids (yet), but I currently drive a Prius that is rated for 54 MPG and my lifetime combined average (45,000 miles) is 61.1 MPG. Different manufacturer and body style, of course, so I can't speak to what the Maverick will do. Getting maximum MPG from a hybrid often requires adjusting how you drive, especially in terms of acceleration style and taking advantage of coasting and regenerative braking. At least with the Prius, for me it became a sort of game to squeeze out the most MPG I can. I hope for the same fun experience with the Maverick.
 

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Maybe 40 mpg with a hypermiling range anxiety driving style. You will be a nuisance on the road. Who will pass you on any road-EVERYONE, including fire trucks and state troopers
If you turn on anything in the vehicle and it’s all a lost hope. Could be possible in little spurts on a strait flat road with zero traffic(are there any left in America) and zero wind, what they will call a legitimate test.I guarantee you will never achieve 500 miles on a single tank. Not even with the gas light on and running it down to nothing, fumes
 

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We get 48-50mpg in our RAV4 hybrid which is of a size and weight similar to the Maverick.
I drive it like I'd drive any other car or truck, and keep up with traffic on the interstate highway.
(Boston-area drivers do observe speed limits, only they're Wyoming/Montana/Texas speed limits.)

I expect I'll see 35-40mpg with the Maverick hybrid we ordered.
Even if gas prices go up to $4 again, the difference between 35mpg and 40mpg or 50mpg is not all that significant.
 

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Maybe 40 mpg with a hypermiling range anxiety driving style. You will be a nuisance on the road. Who will pass you on any road-EVERYONE, including fire trucks and state troopers
If you turn on anything in the vehicle and it’s all a lost hope. Could be possible in little spurts on a strait flat road with zero traffic(are there any left in America) and zero wind, what they will call a legitimate test.I guarantee you will never achieve 500 miles on a single tank. Not even with the gas light on and running it down to nothing, fumes
total ‘negative- Nellie’😂
 

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I have noticed Ford always states “up to 40 mpg’s”…..,not yet have I heard them say it WILL average 40 on a regular basis. So I am expecting to get about 37-ish city….maybe 40 mpg with no A/C, heater, heated seats, etc. Will just have to wait. When I bought my 2017 Niro it stated on the window sticker 49/51 and 50 combined and that is exactly what I average and sometime more …..up to 52-54 city but usually 51 freeway. I will really miss this when I sell it and begin driving the Maverick. I go so long between fill ups I never can remember last time!
I don’t think I’ve seen Ford use ‘up to’ 40 mpg, it’s always ‘estimated’ 40 city mpg and ‘estimated’ 33 highway mp, 37 avg. I believe these estimates will be exceeded in real driving for conservative drivers.
 

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Why get hung up on actual numbers? Whatever it is, it will be significantly higher than anything else in it's class. We have two vehicles that are approx. the same weight and are driven by same drivers under identical conditions. The hybrid vehicle has double (yes double)the fuel economy of the ICE equipped one and hybrid has AWD and 60 more hp to boot.
 

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A modern well-engineered and built hybrid can achieve 50% higher fuel efficiency than its ICE-only counterpart (without hypermiling). Looking at the Maverick, it's about the size of a compact SUV like the RAV4 or the CRV, which means it should deliver 25-30 mpg as ICE-only, which means 40 mpg in optimal conditions is quite realistic.

That said, there will be many drivers who will never get anywhere near the EPA rating. The main mpg killers, in my experience, are (1) "Spirited" driving style, (2) Short driving distances, (3) Cold weather.

Why get hung up on actual numbers? Whatever it is, it will be significantly higher than anything else in it's class. We have two vehicles that are approx. the same weight and are driven by same drivers under identical conditions. The hybrid vehicle has double (yes double)the fuel economy of the ICE equipped one and hybrid has AWD and 60 more hp to boot.

Would you mind sharing what vehicles you are referring to?
Would you mind sharing what vehicles you are referring to?
 

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There have been several reviews by reputable individuals over the last while and all have been impressed with actual Maverick hybrid fuel economy over a variety of driving conditions. Now that there are a few Maverick H getting around there will be a few individuals complaining about fuel economy but these are usually based on one measurement sample of an extreme event such a very high speed driving or other abnormal fuel economy killer and should be taken with a grain of salt. It appears the Mav. H will live up to it's expectations.
 

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There have been several reviews by reputable individuals over the last while and all have been impressed with actual Maverick hybrid fuel economy over a variety of driving conditions. Now that there are a few Maverick H getting around there will be a few individuals complaining about fuel economy but these are usually based on one measurement sample of an extreme event such a very high speed driving or other abnormal fuel economy killer and should be taken with a grain of salt. It appears the Mav. H will live up to it's expectations.
It took months for my Prius to settle into a reliable overall average based on ALL of the various ways it's driven. Calculating the mpg after the first fillup, or even the tenth fillup, just won't give an accurate overall measurement unless you've driven it in all likely temperatures, weather conditions, altitudes, speeds, etc. that mirror your own personal geographic location and lifestyle.

I live in a low altitude moderate temperature geographic part of the US. I drive mostly short distances around town, except I make 200 mile highway trips about once a week. My gas mileage isn't at all representative of someone who deals with mountain roads or freezing temperatures.

It would be fun to know how all of those differences shake out over the course of a year though.
 
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