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Hi there,
I am unfamiliar with how a hybrid functions. Can it still run on gas alone if its battery dies? I have heard that a battery costs $5,000 to replace, so I was hoping to be able to use gas alone for a bit after it dies. Thank you!
 

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Hi there,
I am unfamiliar with how a hybrid functions. Can it still run on gas alone if its battery dies? I have heard that a battery costs $5,000 to replace, so I was hoping to be able to use gas alone for a bit after it dies. Thank you!
It can run on gas only if the high voltage battery dies. In fact, you may see a message that auto start/stop is disabled until the HV battery gets to a sufficient charge level (had this happen in a Fusion once).
 

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Also, from the 2022 Model Year Ford Warranty Guide:

The electrical drivetrain system of your vehicle is covered by the
Hybrid & Electric Vehicle Unique Component coverage for eight years or
100,000 miles, whichever comes first.
The components in the electrical
drivetrain system of your vehicle will vary, depending on whether your
vehicle is a hybrid, plug-in hybrid, but you can rest assured knowing that
your vehicle’s electrical drivetrain system is covered by this
comprehensive warranty. Depending on your vehicle, electrical drivetrain
system components covered by this warranty may include, and are not
limited to: high-voltage battery, high-voltage battery connector, battery
energy control module (BECM), on-board charger, inverter system
controller (ISC), DC/DC converter, hybrid continuously variable
transmission or electric driveline motor and transmission range sensor. If
an electrical drivetrain system component requires replacement under
warranty, it may be replaced with a new, factory remanufactured, or
factory refurbished component, at Ford’s discretion. Refurbished battery
components selected for your vehicle will align with your vehicle’s age
and mileage, and meet Ford’s stringent requirements and standards. (see

Note: High Voltage Battery Gradual Capacity Loss
The high voltage battery will experience gradual capacity loss with time
and use, similar to all batteries, which is considered normal wear and
tear. Loss of battery capacity due to or resulting from gradual capacity
loss is NOT covered under the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. See your
Owner’s Manual for important tips on how to maximize the life and
capacity of the high voltage battery.
 

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Also to add in here, Lithium Ion batteries in the wholesale automotive market are 10% of the cost they were in 2011. Batteries that were $5000 are going for about $1500-2000 now, and the cost is probably more to do with availability than cost of the cells themselves.
 

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Also, from the 2022 Model Year Ford Warranty Guide:

The electrical drivetrain system of your vehicle is covered by the
Hybrid & Electric Vehicle Unique Component coverage for eight years or
100,000 miles, whichever comes first.
The components in the electrical
drivetrain system of your vehicle will vary, depending on whether your
vehicle is a hybrid, plug-in hybrid, but you can rest assured knowing that
your vehicle’s electrical drivetrain system is covered by this
comprehensive warranty. Depending on your vehicle, electrical drivetrain
system components covered by this warranty may include, and are not
limited to: high-voltage battery, high-voltage battery connector, battery
energy control module (BECM), on-board charger, inverter system
controller (ISC), DC/DC converter, hybrid continuously variable
transmission or electric driveline motor and transmission range sensor. If
an electrical drivetrain system component requires replacement under
warranty, it may be replaced with a new, factory remanufactured, or
factory refurbished component, at Ford’s discretion. Refurbished battery
components selected for your vehicle will align with your vehicle’s age
and mileage, and meet Ford’s stringent requirements and standards. (see

Note: High Voltage Battery Gradual Capacity Loss
The high voltage battery will experience gradual capacity loss with time
and use, similar to all batteries, which is considered normal wear and
tear. Loss of battery capacity due to or resulting from gradual capacity
loss is NOT covered under the New Vehicle Limited Warranty. See your
Owner’s Manual for important tips on how to maximize the life and
capacity of the high voltage battery.

this is better than nothing,. but the cynic in me figures they time the warranty to run out just before they figure the battery will.
 

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I'm driving my second Prius, and I sold the 2008 to our son at 140,000 miles. He drove it another 50,000 miles and has just taken ownership of my husband's 2012 Prius C at just over 100,000 miles. Hybrid tech has been around a long time. Pretty much everything on your Maverick will fail before your hybrid battery goes. The one hugely important thing with the hybrid battery (at least with the Prius design) is to never run out of gas. Hybrid batteries support the electric motor and the gas dependent motor, but they are not designed to completely run the vehicle. Really, don't be nervous about that big battery. I just isn't a thing you'll have to think about unless you run out of gas.
 

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I'm driving my second Prius, and I sold the 2008 to our son at 140,000 miles. He drove it another 50,000 miles and has just taken ownership of my husband's 2012 Prius C at just over 100,000 miles. Hybrid tech has been around a long time. Pretty much everything on your Maverick will fail before your hybrid battery goes. The one hugely important thing with the hybrid battery (at least with the Prius design) is to never run out of gas. Hybrid batteries support the electric motor and the gas dependent motor, but they are not designed to completely run the vehicle. Really, don't be nervous about that big battery. I just isn't a thing you'll have to think about unless you run out of gas.
Prius fan here too. They still get a bad rap for some reason...but they are built like a tank and are one of the most reliable vehicles out there, believe it or not. The hybrid eCVT system used by Ford is actually extremely similar to the Toyota Hybrid Synergy Drive that originated in the Prius. Variants are now used in all Toyota hybrids.

Check out this video for technical info :


The simplicity is the beauty of this design. No complex 'shifting transmission' to speak of...just electric motors coupled to the gasoline engine via a planetary gearset. The computer decides of which mix of electric/engine power is appropriate for the situation. Simple and elegant.
 

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I'm driving my second Prius, and I sold the 2008 to our son at 140,000 miles. He drove it another 50,000 miles and has just taken ownership of my husband's 2012 Prius C at just over 100,000 miles. Hybrid tech has been around a long time. Pretty much everything on your Maverick will fail before your hybrid battery goes. The one hugely important thing with the hybrid battery (at least with the Prius design) is to never run out of gas. Hybrid batteries support the electric motor and the gas dependent motor, but they are not designed to completely run the vehicle. Really, don't be nervous about that big battery. I just isn't a thing you'll have to think about unless you run out of gas.

Toyotas are nuts. My Dad had a Tacoma he sold with over 300k miles, original engine and transmission. Now he says the coworker he sold it to drives it to work every day and parks right across from him, lol. additionally when he went to sell it, everybody at work wanted that old tacoma! He even sold it for less than offered because he thought they bid too much.

Anyways I still think the hybrid battery may run out at around 8 yrs, but I hope a cheap one could be found at a junkyard or something like that. If you think about it it's somewhat akin to an engine, it has a finite shelf life, but a lot fewer moving parts LOL. Personally I'm 80% wouldn't get the hybrid at any rate, I want the more power (main factor) and IMO possibly improved reliability of the 2.0. The lower gas mileage is obviously the big downside.

My current truck the 08 Canyon 4 cylinder got 20.5 on the last tank when I recently measured it. I suppose some kind of mix of city and hwy driving, honestly probably leaning to mostly city. so i'm not likely to gain much if any mileage with the 2.0.

Since I have owned the Canyon (7.5 years) I calculated I have put about 13k miles per yr on it (seems like it will be maybe 11-12k this yr, judging I do annual oil changes every summer with long life synthetic, and I just noticed the mileage on my upcoming change in July). Anyways so assuming 20 miles per gallon, that's 650 gallons per yr. At current price of ~2.50 (just a ballpark, currently a bit higher) that's $1625 a yr in gas expenses. So I could save about half that if the hybrid could average 40 (sticking to easy round numbers here). So I could save ~800 per yr with the hybrid vs my current truck or the 2.0. Over 5 years (lets say car loan) that's $4,000. Over 10 years (long term) it's $8,000.

It's a lot but also not really the end of the world either. One unfortunate chance engine replacement could easily eat up 8k in savings, so it's just luck.

One could argue the price of gas is going higher., OTOH there have been long periods the last few years where it's averaged less than 2.50 too be fair. With the current world situation and politics my guess would be gas is more likely to go up than down.

Honestly looking at the new options with unsure reliability and high expense, I appreciate my Canyon more. It's easy to work on, reliable for 135k miles now, still sounds smooth and strong if a bit clickety clackety, and even provides good pep for a 4 banger, partly due to the truck being so small (regular cab), but it's ~185 HP and 191 ft-lb of torque I believe. In practice I've noticed it's just as peppy as my Dad's 2016 "new" Tacoma double cab with the 6 cylinder which I believe he said is rated at 236 HP, probably due to the higher weight etc. If my Canyon just had a double cab I'd probably not even be looking around at new trucks.
 

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Hybrid system has already proved many times the past decade its more reliable than the 2.0 motor. And the batteries are lasting much longer than 8 years, even the original escape hybrid batteries are still going. Did you figure in premium to your calculations also? Extra 80 plus cents a gallon here. Hybrid does not require premium. Time will tell what the mpg will be with each, but I know from the escape threads, the 2.0 guys average 20 or less and and Hybrid people like me are around 42 or more.
 

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Hybrid system has already proved many times the past decade its more reliable than the 2.0 motor. And the batteries are lasting much longer than 8 years, even the original escape hybrid batteries are still going. Did you figure in premium to your calculations also? Extra 80 plus cents a gallon here. Hybrid does not require premium. Time will tell what the mpg will be with each, but I know from the escape threads, the 2.0 guys average 20 or less and and Hybrid people like me are around 42 or more.
We have a 2012 Prius v wagon with around 170K and a 2010 Prius liftback with 140K and both have the original batteries. Unfortunately, we had to give up the 2010 just last week because my daughter was in an accident and the insurance company decided to total the car ( she is OK and it wasn't her fault ). Just replaced it this week with a 2012 Prius C with 63K miles.

There is some discussion on PriusChat that batteries in warmer climates may wear out sooner than colder climates. Another theory is that time matters more to battery life than miles. Probably somewhere in between....but, as usual, nothing conclusive. As for us...we are in a colder climate ( Minnesota )...and no failures yet!
 

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Hybrid system has already proved many times the past decade its more reliable than the 2.0 motor. And the batteries are lasting much longer than 8 years, even the original escape hybrid batteries are still going. Did you figure in premium to your calculations also? Extra 80 plus cents a gallon here. Hybrid does not require premium. Time will tell what the mpg will be with each, but I know from the escape threads, the 2.0 guys average 20 or less and and Hybrid people like me are around 42 or more.
when I bought my Kia Niro hybrid I asked if I could use premium gas and they said it’s not needed….or advised. ….follow manufacturers recommendations..
 
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