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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
The Maverick, a great concept!
If I had any money today, I would be tempted to buy one; except for,
There are a few things I notice aren't ideal:

1- Like some reviewer said, they should create a plugin Hybrid for this vehicle.
I get it, the battery (or lack there of) is what's keeping the price down on these vehicles.
But this truck needs like 35 miles on electric range the least!

2- The 1.1kWh battery is smaller than the already abysmal 1.4kWh battery of a Ford Fusion Hybrid, which pulls less weight, and is more aerodynamic.
I think a lot of hybrid drivers will want to see at least a 3kWh battery, and for a vehicle like this, 5kW is more necessary.

3- The battery for the Maverick, aside from it's size, is also seen as a weakness of the platform.
The Ford Fusion Hybrid 1.4kWh battery, lasts about 177k miles. This battery is lots smaller, and will most definitely wear out faster. Think 125k-150k miles, before it either has to be reconditioned (where after another 80k miles is expected at max), or replaced.

3b- Another reason why the battery will wear out faster, is not only because the pack is smaller, and the truck is heavier than a Fusion Hybrid,
But the electric motor has about 2x the output of a FF hybrid.
The FFH, has 1,4kW battery, and the 30kW (40HP) motor output is frequently limited to 20kW, which is very sluggish. The Maverick has a 60kW motor or 80HP motor. That will generate much higher currents, resulting in quicker battery degradation.
For reference, a Ford Fusion Energi (PHEV) also has the 80HP electric motor this truck has, but has a 7+kWh battery, and does 35 miles on electric.

4- The electric motor is basically useless. The range is low, and the power would have been great for a Ford Fusion Hybrid (though the Energi/PHEV variant has the 80HP motor).
For a truck like this, a 100HP motor is much more desired, especially when towing. The 80HP motor, limited to 40HP due to current constrains (eco mode), is good enough for acceleration up to 30-35MPH, after which the all electric part becomes very sluggish! Unleash the 80HP motor with a decent battery, and the truck will accelerate nicely to 40-45MPH, after which it'll become more dependent on the gasoline engine to pull it's weight (which 45MPH of faster acceleration, is what you need in most cities anyway).

5- The gasoline engine isn't nearly up to the task of towing. Yes, 2000LBS, which is ok for like 1/2 a car. But more than the engine, the CVT is totally not made for towing.
I guess for that they have the Ecoboost versions, with normal AT (automatic transmission).
Still, they shouldn't promote the Maverick Hybrid for any towing, at least not in it's current configuration.


A PHEV version (with ~10kWh) of this would resolve a lot of issues.
For one, the battery will cost more, but also last a lot longer (probably closer to 225k Miles before needing reconditioning.
It would also allow the motor to receive the full 80HP, rather than limit the current to keep the batteries from degrading.
It will add electric range, and can help with towing (allow heavier loads to be towed during the acceleration phase).
The 2.5L gasoline engine can easily tow a good 3000LBS (another car). But it'll depend on how reliable the CVTs are.
The early Ford Fusion Hybrid CVTs broke down between 120-150k miles, partly because of the manufacture BS saying 'no transmission fluid changes necessary 'for the lifetime of the vehicle'', lifetime meaning 125k miles apparently.
Users have found oil changes are recommended around 75k miles (66k miles and the oil still looks good), and certainly not after 100k miles!
For the Maverick, if the same style CVT is used, I would recommend checking the transmission fluid at 66k miles, and replace at 75k if it still looked good at 66k.
Certainly don't believe the 'lifetime of the vehicle', because anything above 100k miles will most certainly be outside of warranty.

If you ask me, within a year to a year and a half we will see many Maverick customers see this problem occur, as they get closer to the 100k miles range.
We will also see Ford update these issues in 2023 models and beyond, and increase the purchase price, like all car manufacturers do.
We all know, introduce a nice looking, but mechanically limited (Achilles heel) product, that people want to swap out in a year or two, and give them the same product with their issues resolved, only at $24k.

I won't be buying one anytime soon. Either a 2024 model, or perhaps the 2022 model once they become available for $10k in the second hand market (which they probably will, as more customers will return their limited and worn vehicles back to the dealerships for an upgrade).
The upgrade will probably also include a decent 10"+ screen as well.
 

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The old Fusion battery pack was a nimh pack, the new Maverick is a Lithium battery pack. Lithium has a higher amount of power and current that can be drawn out of it at one time so thats why its smaller in kwh. Also the old Fusion nimh batteries where air cooled and the Mavericks are liquid cooled so they can get more current either out for driving or back in for charging. So they are actually more powerful than the Fusion batteries are. As far as the electric motor, the Mavericks is a 94kw motor so it has roughly 120+ HP not the 80HP that the Fusion had. Also E-CVT are much different than the old Belt Driven CVT's of the past, an E-CVT has a Planetary Gear Set hooked to an electric motor that can vary the gear ratios. It also helps in charging the HV battery pack and starts the ICE.
 

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You probably should do additional research because the Ecoboost engine with a tow package can tow 4K, and really is not designed for anything huge.
 

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You probably should do additional research because the Ecoboost engine with a tow package can tow 4K, and really is not designed for anything huge.
Not meant for huge, if you want that step it up to a truck with 10k towing, then pay the price 60k plus and the gas (8 mpg) for towing. I posted before I have a 2021 retro trailer 2530# dry weight. After calcs. below GCWR by 754#. This truck has 250 hp and 277 torque. I've been towing for 50 years. I think it's a proper fit. Do your homework.
 

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. That's like complaining that a F250 sucks because you cant park easily, terrible gas, to high for your old lady to get into, Ride is stiff, and cost 60K and up. So we might as well discontinue sales because the majority wont want one. Personally I think the majority will end up with a maverick over the f250 and happily.

(completely non technical)
 

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. That's like complaining that a F250 sucks because you cant park easily, terrible gas, to high for your old lady to get into, Ride is stiff, and cost 60K and up. So we might as well discontinue sales because the majority wont want one. Personally I think the majority will end up with a maverick over the f250 and happily.

(completely non technical)
Right on!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
1- Only the 2010 FFH had NiMh battery packs. All 2011 and up had Lithium packs.
2- the online specs said 80HP motor, from what I read. Not 96. That was an error on the review site. Other sites state 88kW or 118HP, potentially limiting current to 80HP on that motor, only boosting the full amount when the batteries are full, and the pedal floored.
That number would be much more acceptable.
Still, it will put a much higher wear on the battery pack.
3- Liquid cooling is much better than air, but it depends. The air cooling works well, and batteries on the FFH don't get hot. If the liquid cooling is liquid immersed, I would help out. But if the liquid cooling is like tesla, where the batteries are placed against channels which have liquid running through them, chances are that air cooling I actually better. In such a state, only a small section of the batteries are cooled.
4-FFH has an ecvt. Not a belt. Ecvts need oil, and use that oil to both lubricate and cool the cvt, as well as the electric motor.

5- I don't need to 'do my research'. I know the ecoboost tows 4k. The hybrid tows 2k, which is what I wrote, and the reason I said the ecoboost is for towing.
I think the cvt is the limiting factor on towing. It's just sad toy can't even tow a car with it, something you can do with a 1990s Toyota corolla.
 

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1- Only the 2010 FFH had NiMh battery packs. All 2011 and up had Lithium packs.
2- the online specs said 80HP motor, from what I read. Not 96. That was an error on the review site. Other sites state 88kW or 118HP, potentially limiting current to 80HP on that motor, only boosting the full amount when the batteries are full, and the pedal floored.
That number would be much more acceptable.
Still, it will put a much higher wear on the battery pack.
3- Liquid cooling is much better than air, but it depends. The air cooling works well, and batteries on the FFH don't get hot. If the liquid cooling is liquid immersed, I would help out. But if the liquid cooling is like tesla, where the batteries are placed against channels which have liquid running through them, chances are that air cooling I actually better. In such a state, only a small section of the batteries are cooled.
4-FFH has an ecvt. Not a belt. Ecvts need oil, and use that oil to both lubricate and cool the cvt, as well as the electric motor.

5- I don't need to 'do my research'. I know the ecoboost tows 4k. The hybrid tows 2k, which is what I wrote, and the reason I said the economist is for towing.
1- Only the 2010 FFH had NiMh battery packs. All 2011 and up had Lithium packs.
2- the online specs said 80HP motor, from what I read. Not 96. That was an error on the review site. Other sites state 88kW or 118HP, potentially limiting current to 80HP on that motor, only boosting the full amount when the batteries are full, and the pedal floored.
That number would be much more acceptable.
Still, it will put a much higher wear on the battery pack.
3- Liquid cooling is much better than air, but it depends. The air cooling works well, and batteries on the FFH don't get hot. If the liquid cooling is liquid immersed, I would help out. But if the liquid cooling is like tesla, where the batteries are placed against channels which have liquid running through them, chances are that air cooling I actually better. In such a state, only a small section of the batteries are cooled.
4-FFH has an ecvt. Not a belt. Ecvts need oil, and use that oil to both lubricate and cool the cvt, as well as the electric motor.

5- I don't need to 'do my research'. I know the ecoboost tows 4k. The hybrid tows 2k, which is what I wrote, and the reason I said the economist is for towing.
CHLL BRO!
 

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I'll just go by the plethora of recent reviews regarding the hybrid performance and my own experience. Judging by those, Ford got the value vs performance equation exactly right.
Your needs may vary.
 

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1- Only the 2010 FFH had NiMh battery packs. All 2011 and up had Lithium packs.
2- the online specs said 80HP motor, from what I read. Not 96. That was an error on the review site. Other sites state 88kW or 118HP, potentially limiting current to 80HP on that motor, only boosting the full amount when the batteries are full, and the pedal floored.
That number would be much more acceptable.
Still, it will put a much higher wear on the battery pack.
3- Liquid cooling is much better than air, but it depends. The air cooling works well, and batteries on the FFH don't get hot. If the liquid cooling is liquid immersed, I would help out. But if the liquid cooling is like tesla, where the batteries are placed against channels which have liquid running through them, chances are that air cooling I actually better. In such a state, only a small section of the batteries are cooled.
4-FFH has an ecvt. Not a belt. Ecvts need oil, and use that oil to both lubricate and cool the cvt, as well as the electric motor.

5- I don't need to 'do my research'. I know the ecoboost tows 4k. The hybrid tows 2k, which is what I wrote, and the reason I said the ecoboost is for towing.
I think the cvt is the limiting factor on towing. It's just sad toy can't even tow a car with it, something you can do with a 1990s Toyota corolla.
The Maverick does not seem to be the vehicle for you, so why did you join or post anything in this forum?
 

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From all the Hybrid Reviews I have seen most everyone of them praise the power/torque/get up and go of it. 8.0 or so 0-60 is great, enough speed for what it is. Is the EcoBoost faster, sure, can it tow more, sure, but thats not what people are getting the Hybrid for, sure they may tow a jetski or two, a small flatbed or box trailer to the dump, etc. Most people are getting the Hybrid for the fuel economy. So saying that it doesnt have the power and such is not really correct, like I said almost every review I have seen the people have been very impressed by the linear power and feel of the Hybrid Power System, smooth transition from electric to ICE and back, and the regen braking seems to be great also. All in all I think Ford has a winner in this truck.
 

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1- Only the 2010 FFH had NiMh battery packs. All 2011 and up had Lithium packs.
2- the online specs said 80HP motor, from what I read. Not 96. That was an error on the review site. Other sites state 88kW or 118HP, potentially limiting current to 80HP on that motor, only boosting the full amount when the batteries are full, and the pedal floored.
That number would be much more acceptable.
Still, it will put a much higher wear on the battery pack.
3- Liquid cooling is much better than air, but it depends. The air cooling works well, and batteries on the FFH don't get hot. If the liquid cooling is liquid immersed, I would help out. But if the liquid cooling is like tesla, where the batteries are placed against channels which have liquid running through them, chances are that air cooling I actually better. In such a state, only a small section of the batteries are cooled.
4-FFH has an ecvt. Not a belt. Ecvts need oil, and use that oil to both lubricate and cool the cvt, as well as the electric motor.

5- I don't need to 'do my research'. I know the ecoboost tows 4k. The hybrid tows 2k, which is what I wrote, and the reason I said the ecoboost is for towing.
I think the cvt is the limiting factor on towing. It's just sad toy can't even tow a car with it, something you can do with a 1990s Toyota corolla.
Is everyone going to give him a free pass on "you can tow a car behind a '90s Corolla"? If you're going to be doing stupid crap like that, stay off the highways near me. You're a danger to others.
 

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I never wanted a truck because of fuel. I’m buying the hybrid because it has great gas mileage with the look of a truck and not a Prius. Also I don’t think this truck will drop to 10k in two years, but it seems pretty reliable
Current car: SRT8 challenger (10 mpg city)
 

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The Maverick, a great concept!

If you ask me, within a year to a year and a half we will see many Maverick customers see this problem occur, as they get closer to the 100k miles range.
No one mentioned this part.
How many people plan on being close to 100k miles in 1 to 1.5 years?

Would have been easier to just say I can't afford one right now and I'm bummed about it.

Have a great day.
 

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No one mentioned this part.
How many people plan on being close to 100k miles in 1 to 1.5 years?

Would have been easier to just say I can't afford one right now and I'm bummed about it.

Have a great day.
Also, I believe that this maverick battery will last longer than 100k miles. But time will tell.-my 2 cents
 
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