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I been debating this in my head over and over since I ordered hybrid over 2 weeks ago...first time hybrid and needing a vehicle asap...I've thought of changing to eco.. I don't live big city...hwy drive 60+ miles day plus some in town trips I'm hoping mpg will be in mid 30s or higher...still holding on as long as my daily holds up
I live out in the boonies too, about 7 miles off the interstate and 25 miles from anywhere. The hybrid saves so much just from the few stops or slow downs along the way on any trip. It's well worth it. Unless you drive very aggressively you'll always come out ahead of the HWY number. Especially once you get the hang of the Regen.
 

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Test drove a 2.0 EB Maverick XL and an Escape Hybrid SE Sport today. Note, neither car was really broken in so both probably are getting worse mileage than average.

Since new:
37.4 Escape (28 miles)
15.8 Maverick XL (81 miles)

During my short test drive the Maverick was 18'ish. The short test drives are hell on fuel economy, particularly the turbo powertrain. To the extent that my EA888 (VW GTI) is a similar motor, the engine runs rich to help light off the catalytic converter. Taking the kids to school around the corner nets about 18 MPG. On the freeway to work I am 36MPG.

The smooth nature of the hybrid powertrain was a real surprise. The transition to ICE power was seamless as the (much bigger than a starter) Regen Electric Motor could easily torque the 2.5 instantly up to operating speed. Below 40 I could just stay in the electric system. Having the AC run off the electric system is nice in Georgia.

The 2.0 EB is definitely zippier. I does have a torque curve when it is on boost.

The Maverick handles better than the Escape. Feels like the suspension tuning was done by the folks who did the GTI, which is a real compliment. It is fun to drive. I am wondering what it would feel like on some better than average tires, like Michelin Sport 4's. Ordered two XLT's for me and a friend, but the XL is so nice (even has the digital AC controls) that the dark interior says "sporty" more than it does "cheap." An amazing buy.
 

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Weight. It's all about trying to get those mpg numbers with performance all that extra weight. All the added safety equipment weighs a lot. The HF had a seatbelt and that was it. An '88 CRX HF weighed just over 1800 lbs. 1800!
For highway trips especially long ones, I'd agree weight is key, and respectfully add that, in addition to (i) weight, the key issue is DRAG force, a combo of
(ii) speed, (iii) drag coefficient, and (iv) frontal area, and then
(v) engine efficiency vs power&rpm, especially the peak, min_BSFC, and its match to he highway powerload,
and then
(vi) tire design&inflation.
DRAG: The dominant highway Drag factor, profile drag, has equation 0.5*velocity^2*air_density*drag_coeffi* A_frontal, or
Fprofile_drag= rho*v^2*Cd*A/2.
(ii)THE SINGLE BEST THING AMERICANS CAN DO to improve mpg, lower gas costs, save lives, lower maintenance & wear, and stop funding Vladimir Putin's aggression and Saudi Arabian aggression, LIKE 9/11 and TALIBAN victory in AFGHANISTAN, AND lower global warming and particulate pollution , IS TO SLOW DOWN especially on the highway. Slowing just 10%, from 75 to 67, can lower your GAS COST by about 15%. That could be say $10 per tankful that you save and don't give to Exxon, or Putin's war machine or Saudi funding to the Taliban.
(iii-iv) Cd*A: It'd be hard for carmakers to lower frontal area much, for given car type&class, but the Cd can for many models be improved a LOT, especially say for the current full-size pickups that have flat overly large grilles etc. I think the CRX HF had a Cd of only ~0.25, while full size pickups seem to have varied Cd's of about 0.35-0.50.. that's 40%-100% higher, so there is lots of room for improvement, say using racing experience, like efficient frontal designs, smoothing of underbody, Kammback, etc.
[Improving CRX aero - Honda-Tech - Honda Forum Discussion]
[Pickup truck aerodynamics - Page 5 - Fuel Economy, Hypermiling, EcoModding News and Forum - EcoModder.com]

(v) ENGINE EFFICIENCY for gas ICEs the best is usually at close to full power; so an oversized engine (eg 7-liter Semi) will almost always run part-load very inefficiently and add useless block&frame&tank&radiator weight. Hybrid power plants help even on the highway, since the electric system can keep the ICE running steady at or near its optimum, min_BSFC. So choose the smallest engine that meets your needs, with needs really set by your torque and gradeability requirements, the latter at your max payload&trailer weight and altitude.
IMHO acceleration is insanely overrated.. I drove a 220D Benz with a 0-60 of 25+ seconds, and I was okay. You don't need 5s 0-60, or even 10s. Trucks have 0-60 times of say 20-40 s.
Buy the right-sized engine, lower the weight, and keep your money: Detroit/Fiat-Chrysler-Ram, Putin and the Saudis already have more $$ than they need let alone deserve.
TELL YOUR DEALER YOU WANT EFFICIENT VEHICLES
. plug-ins even better, power takeoff, quiet off-roading, etc.
 

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You'd be surprised how often in steady driving the electric motor assists the gas powered engine. If you set your display to monitor that sort of thing, it's both mesmerizing and distracting, but there's just a regular shift of charge and discharge - and back and forth assist during highway driving.
The gas engine runs most-efficiently (min BSFC) at near its max power, and there is a fair amount of detail to the BSFC map (fuel consumption vs power and rpm). So at partial load, say running steady at 60 mph, a good hybrid control system figures out how to run the gas engine for a while at above the car's power steady power needs, running at or near min BSFC. The extra power charges the battery. I guess then the set points shift and that electric energy is used to help the engine while it runs at a lower power, and that this is beneficial despite electric and battery round trip losses
It's pretty complex I guess Formula 1 and other racing classes are probably really familiar with this
 

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Long post warning:

I've driven hybrids since 2008 (all Toyotas). Unless you're getting directly on the highway and not stopping ever at all until you get to your destination, and never just driving to the store or a restaurant - or whatever - then you're doing some mixed driving. Even if you ONLY drive on interstates at high speed, and never have to idle in traffic or stop at signal lights, your mileage is still going to depend on altitude and temperature and the weight your carrying.

My current car sits pretty firmly at an average mpg of 52.4 to 52.6. I live in the very flat, low altitude, moderate weather mid-Atlantic coastal area. I drive on highways a lot. I also drive in town a bit. And sit in super annoying traffic sometimes. I don't carry much load except when it's my turn to drive the 4 adults to the big city for college basketball games (maybe once a week during the season).

So that's what I do, and I get 52.4 mpg doing it in a car that's EPA rated at 50 mpg city/48 highway, I think.

Last week, I loaded my husband, his recumbent touring bicycle, bike rack, camping gear, a filled 35 quart cooler, luggage, bike tools, big ass first aid kit, and a full tank of gas, and transported all that crap uphill to the mountains of NC, some 290 miles away. My gas mileage for that trip was 44.9. I spent the week working my way back in a generally downhill direction - minus husband and bike - while my husband cycled the Mountains to Coast Ride. (He rides; I report/blog about it.)

By the time we made it to the beach on Saturday, my 'trip' mileage was 49.6 mpg, and my Life of Car mpg was at 51.2 mpg.

tl;dr: The Maverick has a bigger hybrid battery, but weighs more. I would expect it to get about 8% better mpg than predicted in ideal driving environments and maybe 5% less than predicted under more extreme driving environments. Either way, it's better than anything else on the market.
Thank you very helpful and useful. Is your car a Prius? Which model/year?
 

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Worst case scenario for the hybrid (highway at 75MPH) should still have better fuel economy than the Ecoboost. I still get about 40MPG in my Fusion Hybrid with the pedal down and highway the entire way; I would wager the hybrid Maverick in the same situation would be around 36MPG. Ecoboost is there for more power and more hauling/towing. (and not having to wait)

(* pure speculation)
Thanks very helpful.
 

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I been debating this in my head over and over since I ordered hybrid over 2 weeks ago...first time hybrid and needing a vehicle asap...I've thought of changing to eco.. I don't live big city...hwy drive 60+ miles day plus some in town trips I'm hoping mpg will be in mid 30s or higher...still holding on as long as my daily holds up
As a Maverick CLT Eco Boost AWD owner I cal tell you that if you want to get mid 30s or higher in a Maverick you better wait for the hybrid model.
 

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2022 FORD MAVERICK LARIET, First Edition,Tow Package 2.0 Eco Boost Turbo. Loaded bed and rear seat from travel to our beach house with a Thule bike rack and 2 bikes 2 adults 1 dog driving in rain at 65mph average ..Absolutely love this truck ! Ordered another one a 2023 Lariat Black Special Edition, black wheels and interior within the 5 day window!
 

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2022 ford maverick larait
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Some of the forum members here where the first to do pre orders . So you should be seating behind the wheel of your new maverick very soon . Please post the actual miles per gallon that you’re getting with your new truck after a tank or two of gas . Thanks
View attachment 1784
27 when the weather was warm 25 since it got cold all city driving
 
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