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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What does this mean to a layman?
To me, it seems to indicate that this hybrid configuration doesn't behave like a CVT transmission, but more like a small moped. In other words, it seems that the engine won't stick to a fixed RPM but will increase the RPM as it accelerates.
 

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Dyno testing is carried out by applying full throttle at just above idle and holding there until maximum safe RPM is reached in order to measure maximum torque through entire engine speed range. This is not a good indication of how a hybrid operates. During normal operation Hybrid drive trains utilize a combination of ECVT, gas engine, motor generator, traction motor and battery to maintain gas engine at optimum operating RPM (usually around 2-2.5 thousand RPM) for maximum efficiency. During periods of high demand such as hard acceleration or ascending a steep hill, engine RPM will increase to supply extra power but will return to normal as load decreases.
 

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Dyno testing is carried out by applying full throttle at just above idle and holding there until maximum safe RPM is reached in order to measure maximum torque through entire engine speed range. This is not a good indication of how a hybrid operates. During normal operation Hybrid drive trains utilize a combination of ECVT, gas engine, motor generator, traction motor and battery to maintain gas engine at optimum operating RPM (usually around 2-2.5 thousand RPM) for maximum efficiency. During periods of high demand such as hard acceleration or ascending a steep hill, engine RPM will increase to supply extra power but will return to normal as load decreases.
Good post, but there's always a catch.
We don't know for sure how the Maverick is calibrated for EV only operation: How far and how fast can you go in EV only mode? At what speed does the ICE cut in? At what load will it cut in? Battery percentage? All of this affects engine operation as well.
But, correct; If this vehicle follows the operating characteristics of previous Ford hybrids the engine will not operate like a generator; at a fixed rpm. Engine RPM will fluctuate depending on the load placed on it as you've described.

I highly recommend anyone who has never driven a hybrid like this (eCvt) to take an extended test drive in one so that they can experience how they operate. Everyone will find their own definition of how it operates to some extent depending on how they drive.
 

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Having rented several Ford Fusion hybrids and own a Toyota H, I can share my "observations" on how they act on the road and can only assume the the new Maverick will follow.
With limited battery storage capacity these vehicles operate in EV mode for short distances and low loads. ICE will cut in at speeds above about 30 kph or when brisk acceleration is required or when ascending a hill or when approx. two kilometers is traveled.

When pulling away from a stop light it will start off in EV and transition to ICE shortly after and cycle between modes depending on load requirements. When approaching stop ICE will shut down and MG will dump excess charge into battery as brakes are applied and ICE will remain off until vehicle starts moving again and load requirements increase.

During highway use ICE will run almost continuously due to increased load and will only shut down when slowing down or descending a grade. System will draw from battery during high demand conditions and replenish it during low demand conditions. On an added note, Hybrids will maintain a +- 2 kph cruise control speed on the highway with none of the shifting and over speeding antics of most conventional ICE/multispeed trans. combos.
 

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Does a plug in hybrid have the same equipment and programming? This may not be a great comparison.
Not the same equipment or programming, but in many instances the operation is very similar.
The main difference being that a plug-in hybrid can be used in EV only mode for a much longer period of time and usually at higher speeds. They may also have a more flexible user menu where the operator can choose how the ICE or electric powertrains utilize available power. The non plug in hybrid will not be as flexible with how the electric/engine are utilized.
A good comparison would be, a plug in hybrid with a low state of battery charge would be more similar to a standard hybrid.
 
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