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Good video
It has time stamps in the Comment section so you to go to specific topic of interest.
I don’t know, after watch the video…nice that he did it…I am not 100% certain I would concur with all points made. My take on a hybrid (be it a Mav or my highlander) would be more of the following:
  • Yes you can strive to get great/best mpg though honestly I mostly just drive it as a car/suv. I will though try to use the brake when coming to a light and have enough lead time to see if it does capture more regen brake effect. Honestly, I always figured when the wheels are free spinning the turning rotors is what creates the regen effect as I always though there was very so slightly regen braking in some form going on during coasting.
  • I never turn the a/c off to get better mpg (though certain it would).
  • If driving up in say PA then when coming up to a mountain/large hill pass I will speed up more then normal for just a bit so that as I get closer to the top my speed decreases without me having to have pressed the gas peddle for a longer (harder) period of time.
  • I find one can travel for a bit (less then 1 mile for certain) in battery mode only (gas engine not running) though that is mostly on fat land and at speeds say around 30 mpg. It is surprise though even at highway speed, though mostly with a very slight down grade, the battery might be the only thing being used and not the engine for short periods of time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Gearing down should be no issue, I believe that’s what the L gear is for. With 4K tow that could add a tow/haul mode that is also more optimized for downhill descents. However, if you’re talking about having paddle shifters then the Maverick definitely won’t. A few CVT cars have paddle shifters but they’re usually implemented pretty poorly, since ultimately it’s trying to “fake” the feeing of a traditional transmission, and I’m not sure if any eCVT cars have them.

I am focused on the Maverick only….and I’m talking about STEEP roads….not hills. In other words so steep I will have to ride brakes all the way down. Someone mentioned an L but is there an L for any ecvt?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
I am focused on the Maverick only….and I’m talking about STEEP roads….not hills. In other words so steep I will have to ride brakes all the way down. Someone mentioned an L but is there an L for any ecvt?

one steep road in very high.. my Niro pegs at 99mpg’s as I coast down. I c there are other cars on the road I have to slow down….and ride brake all the way. I hate doing that.
 

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I am focused on the Maverick only….and I’m talking about STEEP roads….not hills. In other words so steep I will have to ride brakes all the way down. Someone mentioned an L but is there an L for any ecvt?
Yes there is an L gear, you can actually see it on the build tool as well as in various reviews. Shouldn’t matter how steep, the regenerative braking will give you a huge advantage over the ecoboost in terms of not actually riding the brakes themselves all the way down, while also charging your battery for free.
 

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Bently, I read the article but it only spoke od EV cars….no mention of gas/electric. Wondering if same answer for a hybrid?
Ford isn't going to let the Maverick not have regenerative braking it helps in everyway.
 

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one steep road in very high.. my Niro pegs at 99mpg’s as I coast down. I c there are other cars on the road I have to slow down….and ride brake all the way. I hate doing that.
Again, you'd really have to experience it. I suggest you test drive an escape hybrid and hopefully the salesperson is experienced enough to explain what is happening.

I am also talking STEEP, LONG grades. In your car, you downshift to increase engine rpm/load. The increased strain on the ENGINE slows the vehicle, allowing you to save brake wear. You command the higher engine load by moving the gear lever.
In modern hybrids during deceleration, the electric motor is used to increase the load on the drivetrain, causing the vehicle to slow. You command this increased load by pressing the brake pedal. The service brakes are not even engaging at light applications. Riding the 'brakes' down a steep, long hill will slow the vehicle MORE than downshifting an ICE vehicle, and use less of the actual brakes.

I know it's hard to grasp the concept, so all I can advise is that you drive a vehicle that works like this. After a bit and monitoring regen, etc. It will just click, and you'll get it.
 

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one steep road in very high.. my Niro pegs at 99mpg’s as I coast down. I c there are other cars on the road I have to slow down….and ride brake all the way. I hate doing that.
What is the grade? You can only do so much with percent grade.
 

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I know I'm just going to confuse the issue, but...
In my other Ford hybrids, 'L' range simply provides increased regeneration when letting off the accelerator, causing the vehicle to slow more. It did not change transmission operation. I suspect this will be the same?
Maybe I too should drive a new escape hybrid so I can be better informed!
 

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Just an aside here…too me it will feel weird to have to twist a round dial to change in a L gear. Too used to Sticks I guess in automatics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Again, you'd really have to experience it. I suggest you test drive an escape hybrid and hopefully the salesperson is experienced enough to explain what is happening.

I am also talking STEEP, LONG grades. In your car, you downshift to increase engine rpm/load. The increased strain on the ENGINE slows the vehicle, allowing you to save brake wear. You command the higher engine load by moving the gear lever.
In modern hybrids during deceleration, the electric motor is used to increase the load on the drivetrain, causing the vehicle to slow. You command this increased load by pressing the brake pedal. The service brakes are not even engaging at light applications. Riding the 'brakes' down a steep, long hill will slow the vehicle MORE than downshifting an ICE vehicle, and use less of the actual brakes.

I know it's hard to grasp the concept, so all I can advise is that you drive a vehicle that works like this. After a bit and monitoring regen, etc. It will just click, and you'll get it.
your explanation has helped! I’m going to Ford dealer tomorrow to drive the Escape…or any other CVT to see how it feels.
Thank you.
 

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They'd have to dig up a Ford 500 (before it became the Taurus) or Freestyle from the boneyard to find a non-hybrid CVT Ford.
 

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I have never had CVT trans in a vehicle. I have 6 speed DCT in Kia Niro and when needed, such as going down steep hills or mountain roads I can use the trans as manual …so as to slow the car down w/out riding the brakes. It can be driven auto or manual.
Is that even possible with eCVT? Is there a way to gear down in Maverick or do I have to just ride the brakes all the way down hill? I don’t like the sound of doing that so this might influence me to forget Mav and keep my Kia Niro w/ DCT. I live in High Sierra foothills w/ lots of mountainous terrain.
I know this is probably dumb question but I am ignorant of knowing the answer. No where do I EVER hear anyone discuss this so there’s got to be a logic,a answer.
Please advise …and thank you.
If you only have a smart ass answer, please don’t waste anyone’s time reading. 🙄
There are no dumb questions. I'm looking at getting a hybrid also, first I've ever owned. No Owners Manual yet for Maverick, but next closest is for the 2021 Escape hybrid which we all can look at.

I believe the 2021 Escape Hybrid (with 2.5l Atkinson cycle engine) is "similar" to what we'll be getting in the Maverick. I know the Maverick e-CVT is different (a new Ford-designed in-house electric motor in Maverick vs outsources electric motor in Escape), but I'm guessing the planetary CVT is the same. Basically says that here:
Ford's New In-House Maverick Hybrid E-Motor is 20 Percent Lighter (designnews.com)

From the 2021 Escape owners manual (note the Grade Assist section words):
Untitled (fordservicecontent.com)

HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE
DRIVING CHARACTERISTICS

The gasoline engine starts and stops to
provide power when required and to save
fuel when not needed. When coasting at
low speeds, coming to a stop or standing,
the gas engine normally shuts down and
your vehicle operates in electric-only
mode.
Conditions that may cause the gasoline
engine to start or remain running include:
• Considerable vehicle acceleration.
• Driving uphill.
• The high voltage battery charge level
is low.
• Heating or cooling the vehicle interior
in high or low outside temperatures.
• The gasoline engine is below normal
operating temperature.
• Towing a trailer.
Certain selectable drive modes could
cause the engine to run. See Selecting
a Drive Mode (page 262).

Your hybrid vehicle also comes with
standard hydraulic braking and
regenerative braking. Regenerative braking
is performed by your transmission and
captures brake energy and stores it in the
high voltage battery.
You could also notice that your engine
continues to run instead of shutting off
during extended downhill driving. The
engine stays on during this engine braking
but is not using any fuel.

You could also hear a slight whine or
whistle when operating your vehicle. This
is the normal operation of the electric
motor in the hybrid system.
-----------------------------------------------------
SELECTING A DRIVE MODE -
EXCLUDING: PLUG-IN HYBRID
ELECTRIC VEHICLE (PHEV)

Note: Drive mode changes may not be
available when the ignition is off.
Note: Button icon shown may vary from
your vehicle.
Note: Selected drive mode displays in the
information display.
------------------------------------------------------
GRADE ASSIST - HYBRID
ELECTRIC VEHICLE (HEV)

What Is Grade Assist
Provides additional grade braking with a
combination of engine motoring and
high-voltage battery charging to help
maintain vehicle speed when descending
a grade.

Switching Grade Assist On and Off
Press the grade assist button to activate
grade assist. The grade assist lamp
appears in the instrument cluster. Press
the button again to switch it off.
Your vehicle determines the amount of
engine motoring and high-voltage battery
charging. You could notice the engine
speed increasing and decreasing to help
maintain your vehicle speed when
descending a slope.
Grade Assist Indicators
(symbol of car going downhill)
--------------------------------------------------
For all of you out there more in the know - are there any good photos of a Maverick hybrid interior that might show where that magic grade assist button might be?
 
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