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Electric Continuously Varibale Transmission, eCVT (not eCVT transmission) come in many different configurations. Ford design, in my opinion, is fantastic. Im buying the truck with full confidence that it will run flawlessly. Now the fact the eCVT is part of the 100k mile hybrid warranty should put to rest concerns of issues with it costing us money. As for driving, it will drive differently than the escape hybrid but not much more.

Link to Fords hybrid warranty 8 year 100k
 

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So maybe others have answered question below or person that posted this thread was able to test drive a Escape to determine answer.
  • So if one gets cruise control, I am guessing when going down hill it will not prevent the truck from going faster then the speed the cruise control as set to. Could be wrong on this point. I know bmw on their bikes just started to add this ‘safety’ feature. Though on their bikes you can now get ACC, prior their bikes only offered regular cruise control.
  • I am though guessing if one gets the Ford adaptive cruise control (acc) then when going down a hill it will ‘auto brake’ (apply the braking somewhat) to prevent the truck from exceeding the mph one had set on the cruise control.
At least I would hope it would.
And last, even it either or both bullet points above prevents the truck from going too fast down a hill then to me question would be does it use engine braking (very doubtful) or truck brakes (way more likely).

Since the truck only offers a dial for gears and even with that just a ‘L’ selection I have to figure we could not use the trucks engine as a means of downshifting to slow decent down a hill.
 

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So maybe others have answered question below or person that posted this thread was able to test drive a Escape to determine answer.
  • So if one gets cruise control, I am guessing when going down hill it will not prevent the truck from going faster then the speed the cruise control as set to. Could be wrong on this point. I know bmw on their bikes just started to add this ‘safety’ feature. Though on their bikes you can now get ACC, prior their bikes only offered regular cruise control.
  • I am though guessing if one gets the Ford adaptive cruise control (acc) then when going down a hill it will ‘auto brake’ (apply the braking somewhat) to prevent the truck from exceeding the mph one had set on the cruise control.
At least I would hope it would.
And last, even it either or both bullet points above prevents the truck from going too fast down a hill then to me question would be does it use engine braking (very doubtful) or truck brakes (way more likely).

Since the truck only offers a dial for gears and even with that just a ‘L’ selection I have to figure we could not use the trucks engine as a means of downshifting to slow decent down a hill.
I drive a Prius and the electric generator slows the cars during decent. I have seen the car fail to the the speed down on extreme grades which has happened a couple times in 120k miles of driving it.

I presume the turbo cruise control would work the same as any ICE car
 

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The 2.0L should also moderate downhill cruise speed via torque converter lockup and/or downshifting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
There are no dumb questions. I'm looking at getting a hybrid also, first I've ever owned. No Owners Manual yet for Maverick, but next closest is for the 2021 Escape hybrid which we all can look at.

I believe the 2021 Escape Hybrid (with 2.5l Atkinson cycle engine) is "similar" to what we'll be getting in the Maverick. I know the Maverick e-CVT is different (a new Ford-designed in-house electric motor in Maverick vs outsources electric motor in Escape), but I'm guessing the planetary CVT is the same. Basically says that here:
Ford's New In-House Maverick Hybrid E-Motor is 20 Percent Lighter (designnews.com)

From the 2021 Escape owners manual (note the Grade Assist section words):
Untitled (fordservicecontent.com)

HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE
DRIVING CHARACTERISTICS

The gasoline engine starts and stops to
provide power when required and to save
fuel when not needed. When coasting at
low speeds, coming to a stop or standing,
the gas engine normally shuts down and
your vehicle operates in electric-only
mode.
Conditions that may cause the gasoline
engine to start or remain running include:
• Considerable vehicle acceleration.
• Driving uphill.
• The high voltage battery charge level
is low.
• Heating or cooling the vehicle interior
in high or low outside temperatures.
• The gasoline engine is below normal
operating temperature.
• Towing a trailer.
Certain selectable drive modes could
cause the engine to run. See Selecting
a Drive Mode (page 262).

Your hybrid vehicle also comes with
standard hydraulic braking and
regenerative braking. Regenerative braking
is performed by your transmission and
captures brake energy and stores it in the
high voltage battery.
You could also notice that your engine
continues to run instead of shutting off
during extended downhill driving. The
engine stays on during this engine braking
but is not using any fuel.

You could also hear a slight whine or
whistle when operating your vehicle. This
is the normal operation of the electric
motor in the hybrid system.
-----------------------------------------------------
SELECTING A DRIVE MODE -
EXCLUDING: PLUG-IN HYBRID
ELECTRIC VEHICLE (PHEV)

Note: Drive mode changes may not be
available when the ignition is off.
Note: Button icon shown may vary from
your vehicle.
Note: Selected drive mode displays in the
information display.
------------------------------------------------------
GRADE ASSIST - HYBRID
ELECTRIC VEHICLE (HEV)

What Is Grade Assist
Provides additional grade braking with a
combination of engine motoring and
high-voltage battery charging to help
maintain vehicle speed when descending
a grade.

Switching Grade Assist On and Off
Press the grade assist button to activate
grade assist. The grade assist lamp
appears in the instrument cluster. Press
the button again to switch it off.
Your vehicle determines the amount of
engine motoring and high-voltage battery
charging. You could notice the engine
speed increasing and decreasing to help
maintain your vehicle speed when
descending a slope.
Grade Assist Indicators
(symbol of car going downhill)
--------------------------------------------------
For all of you out there more in the know - are there any good photos of a Maverick hybrid interior that might show where that magic grade assist button might be?
Go to www.maverick truck club.com Someone just posted great interior pics as they were at the Chicago Aurora show last week. That site is VERY informative as compared to www.maverickchat.com
 

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I have never had CVT trans in a vehicle. I have 6 speed DCT in Kia Niro and when needed, such as going down steep hills or mountain roads I can use the trans as manual …so as to slow the car down w/out riding the brakes. It can be driven auto or manual.
Is that even possible with eCVT? Is there a way to gear down in Maverick or do I have to just ride the brakes all the way down hill? I don’t like the sound of doing that so this might influence me to forget Mav and keep my Kia Niro w/ DCT. I live in High Sierra foothills w/ lots of mountainous terrain.
I know this is probably dumb question but I am ignorant of knowing the answer. No where do I EVER hear anyone discuss this so there’s got to be a logic,a answer.
Please advise …and thank you.
If you only have a smart ass answer, please don’t waste anyone’s time reading. 🙄
First there are no dumb questions when you are spending your money… The Maverick will have regenerative braking (charging the battery). It will not take long at all to get the feel for it. With my Camry hybrid, when I traveled in the mountains, I would sometimes shift to neutral on downhill runs because the regenerative braking was a bit more than I liked… On inclines, you don’t have the transmission hunting for the correct gear… my bet, you will love driving it in the foothills. After owning a cvt hybrid and a geared hybrid, give me the cvt any day 😉
 

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I haven't driven a Maverick yet :) however I believe the Maverick's eCVT is similar to the eCVT in our Toyota RAV4 Hybrid.
Our RAV4 has multiple selectable "gears" (they simulate the gears in a traditional transmission) which the Maverick does not, but I don't use that feature.
I drive our hybrid the same way I'd drive any automatic, using the accelerator to go faster or the brake pedal to go slower.

When I go down a hill I take my foot off the accelerator and the hybrid system slows the car slightly and generates electricity.
If the hill is steep, I use the brake pedal, which generates more electricity but doesn't engage the brake calipers/pads unless I really stomp on the brake pedal.
My clue to what's happening is the power gauge, which shows how much electricity is being generated (not very precisely).

I'll attach a Ford stock photo of the Maverick's instrument panel to show you the power gauge from an XL (the large dial to the left).
Here's how the gauge is described in the Ford Escape owner's manual (remember that the Maverick and Escape are similar):

The power gauge displays power to the
wheels when accelerating or maintaining
speed. When slowing down by lifting your
foot off the accelerator pedal or pressing
the brake, the gauge displays the power
captured by the regenerative braking
system and returned to the high voltage
battery.

View attachment 787
 
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