Ford Maverick Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is not a complaint, but a mention: the numbers coming out of the 2.5L engine seem slim, but Ford mentions that, combined with the electric motor's output, horsepower is 191.

Electric motors put out gobs of low end torque, but when publishing output numbers, Ford never mentions the motor's output; they only mention the torque coming out of the gas engine.

Anyone have a guess as to what kind of torque the powertrain combo puts out?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Anyone have a guess as to what kind of torque the powertrain combo puts out?
Ford never publishes the combined torque for their hybrids even though their system is very similar to Toyota's (and they do).

I am not 100% sure why this is but it might be because sometimes the gas engine runs, sometimes the electric and sometimes both - I think it is very situational.

Having said that, I have the old version of the electric motor in this system in my Ford Cmax. I saw somewhere that that motor had 170 lb/ft of torque. The newer motor is within a couple KW of the old motor in total output (~90 KW if I remember) but has a different design that may have a different torque curve.

Basically, I suspect Ford redesigned the electric motor for the Maverick to enhance its torque, given that it is going into a truck and not a compact SUV or car. Having said that, when you combine some portion of the 158 lb/ft of torque from the motor with some combination of the 170 lb/ft from the electric, I would expect the Maverick would have peak torque of well over 200 lb/ft. In addition, given the characteristics of the eCVT, I would expect the Maverick would be able to put it down nearly instantly and seamlessly.
 

·
Registered
2018 F150 XLT 2wd 2.7EB
Joined
·
32 Posts
It confused me too. My initial mistake was confusing the new electric motor output numbers with the hybrid battery numbers. Then it (mostly) made more sense.

From the FoMoCo spec sheet:
2.5l Atkinson cycle ICE engine = 162 hp* @ 5600 rpm, torque = 155 lb-ft* @ 4000 rpm
*premium fuel
Hybrid system – electric motor output (peak) = 94 kw (~126 hp), torque = 173 lb-ft

From Motortrend article (2022 Ford Maverick: Why There’s No AWD Hybrid Version of the Small Truck—Yet (motortrend.com) – Hybrid battery pack = 27 kw (~36 hp)

You add ICE HP and battery pack hp = 188 hp (which is close to Ford’s 191 “Total System HP”). I don’t know where the other 3 hp go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
This article makes an interesting statement that I think makes this discussion a little more complex: "the engine and motor-generator can only muster 94 kW of juice to feed this motor"

This would indicate that by feeding off the gas engine and the battery the electric motor is able to produce 126 hp of that 191 total hp. This would mean that the gas engine would able to produce another 65 HP on top of that, after subtracting what the electric motor is drawing.

In this mode of hybrid operation, that would mean the generator/electric motor is drawing roughly 60% of the gas engine's power. In that respect, we may be able to (very) roughly estimate that the gas engine is contributing 40% of its maximum torque on top of the electric motor when it is operating at peak power.

This speculation is probably a bit naive of how the system works as a whole however. In addition, the electric motor and the gas engine probably would probably be producing their peak torque at different RPMs, which makes it difficult to make sense of the math.

Maybe this is why Ford is reluctant to share concrete torque numbers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Personally I'm not holding out hope it is going to be very torque-y.

In like the Escape similar hybrids, I think the 0-60 times is like 8.7 vs 6.7 on the 2.0. I could be completely wrong on those numbers. But that tells you the true story.

Some of the hybrid fans will try to convince you eventually the hybrid beats the 2.0 in every single thing, but it's just not true LOL. The 2.0 will be flat out much more powerful and capable.

I too would like more detail about the hybrid. If I could be convinced it was "good enough" I might consider it. However no AWD is also a big issue regardless for me.

Overall though, just be glad we are WAY ahead of the pathetic engines they get in Europe, or in underpowered small cars, or like my 94 Isuzu I used to own which delivered I believe 96HP, and EVERYTHING walked away from it at a stop light.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Some of the hybrid fans will try to convince you eventually the hybrid beats the 2.0 in every single thing, but it's just not true LOL. The 2.0 will be flat out much more powerful and capable.
It goes without saying the 2.0 will be much more powerful and that is why it is the only engine in the Maverick that is rated for towing 4,000 lbs.

Having said that, as a hybrid owner I would say that the acceleration numbers of the Escape Hybrid probably don't tell the whole story... How often are you going to be drag racing somebody from 0-60 in a hybrid Maverick? Hopefully, never because that is besides the point but in normal driving and passing the hybrid should have more than enough power. I suspect 0-60 times aren't good because the battery is not designed to provide sustained acceleration like that. In short bursts, it probably provides better acceleration than the numbers would have you suspect.

Based on my experience driving a hybrid, I suspect the real question for anybody asking these questions is, "How much do you need to tow?" Also, "Do you prioritize fuel economy or acceleration?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
It goes without saying the 2.0 will be much more powerful and that is why it is the only engine in the Maverick that is rated for towing 4,000 lbs.

Having said that, as a hybrid owner I would say that the acceleration numbers of the Escape Hybrid probably don't tell the whole story... How often are you going to be drag racing somebody from 0-60 in a hybrid Maverick? Hopefully, never because that is besides the point but in normal driving and passing the hybrid should have more than enough power. I suspect 0-60 times aren't good because the battery is not designed to provide sustained acceleration like that. In short bursts, it probably provides better acceleration than the numbers would have you suspect.

Based on my experience driving a hybrid, I suspect the real question for anybody asking these questions is, "How much do you need to tow?" Also, "Do you prioritize fuel economy or acceleration?"

Yep. I dont even need AWD or 2.0 I just "want" it. This may be the only new vehicle I buy in my life, I'm frugal, and 46. I want to splurge a little and get everything I want. Ok at least the big stuff, the add ons on the build and price start nickel and diming you to death lol.

Also it's my only vehicle. Lots of people here seem to be buying it as a secondary, and often have a big hefty truck for truck duty already. I dont.

I never tow anything, never offroad, most I do is haul a few things from home depot. Not to say oneday things couldn't change and all the sudden I want to hual a trailer. That said we had a record week long ice blast this past year, and thats a big reason I'm set on AWD. But even that could change. I think FWD alone would be way better than my RWD Canyon, those are horrendous since there's no weight in the bed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am not 100% sure why this is but it might be because sometimes the gas engine runs, sometimes the electric and sometimes both - I think it is very situational.
Yours is an excellent, and plausible, explanation. Thanks.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top