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I am really just looking for the engine that will last longer and be more reliable. I have a bad feeling on the ecoboost as the turbos seem to go out easily... but not sure if the new e-cvt hybrid is better. What are your guys thoughts??
 

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I am going Hybrid for the fact that the 2.0l ecoboost do have some turbo, exhaust, head problems, not to mention the intake valves carboning up around 80,000-100,000 miles and needing to be cleaned. I think the hybrid is the way to go, no accessory belt drive system on the front of the engine, no external starter or alternator to go out and have to fight to replace. Everything is electric driven. I think the 2.5l hybrid will be more reliable, also they dial back the horsepower on the 2.5l hybrid so its not putting out max power all the time and rely on the electric motor to fill in the loss of power from the gas engine. Also the E-CVT is not like the old belt driven CVT of the past, those were junk, the E-CVT thats in the Maverick is really close to the Escape Hybrid E-CVT and both are closely related to the Toyota Prius and Rav 4 E-CVT. All very reliable.
 

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Simple: You want more power and fun = Ecoboost / You want more MPG = Hybrid. They both get good MPG, but Hybrid wins that task, but the Ecoboost gives you more thrills behind the wheel.
 

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I am really just looking for the engine that will last longer and be more reliable. I have a bad feeling on the ecoboost as the turbos seem to go out easily... but not sure if the new e-cvt hybrid is better. What are your guys thoughts??
Hybrid.
The jury is still out on the updated CVT. The basic design is the same bullet-proof layout as previous models but they could always change some other insignificant part which could lead to issues, like a bearing 😉. But any flaws such as this should be made apparent within the warranty period, so I'm not all that concerned.
The 2.5 Atkinson cycle duratec is a modified/simplified version which has been around forever. Jointly developed with Mazda in 2001. It could be considered crude by modern standards but the hybrid makes up for the shortfalls. In this application it works very well. Dead simple, port injected, reliable. De-tuned for hybrid duty improves fuel efficiency and keeps it very under-stressed.

I plan on keeping this Maverick a while. Hybrid all day long for me.
 

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The hybrid (and price!) is what originally got my attention. But after careful thought I went with the Ecoboost since I live in the Northeast and want the AWD capabilities due to the weather. I wonder if they will ever offer an AWD hybrid🤔
 

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The hybrid (and price!) is what originally got my attention. But after careful thought I went with the Ecoboost since I live in the Northeast and want the AWD capabilities due to the weather. I wonder if they will ever offer an AWD hybrid🤔
It's an interesting question. They may eventually but I don't think they will any time soon.

The reason I think this depends on other future products. There are some rumors floating around that the next-gen Ranger will be available as a Plug-in Hybrid. I would guess AWD will be available with that. If the Ranger is indeed configured that way I think they'll run with the current Maverick lineup as is due a long time and push those who want a plug-in or hybrid AWD to Ranger or Escape, and those who want Full EV to Lightning and keep the Maverick as entry/premium entry level.
 

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I went with the EcoBoost because direct injected turbos are a known quantity for me. And I wanted AWD and the tow package. I don't have anything to tow right now, but if I'm already spending new car money, I may as well have the capability to tow a small camper or some bikes or jetskis or a small boat later on down the line. I expect to keep the Maverick until it's used up or becomes too expensive to maintain or fuel. So I just had the dealer check all the boxes on it, so I don't get to the end of the powertrain warranty and go "man, I wish this thing had <x> feature".
 

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Wife has a Toyota Rav4 Hybrid and if the Maverick H is similar then it will be a winner. Hybrids have very linear power delivery with no hesitation or flat spots. Very hard to match with an ICE and conventional transmission combo.
As far as winter driving with front wheel drives. Obviously not as confidence inspiring as AWD vehicles but they have much better traction and control than RWDs.
 

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Wife has a Toyota Rav4 Hybrid and if the Maverick H is similar then it will be a winner. Hybrids have very linear power delivery with no hesitation or flat spots. Very hard to match with an ICE and conventional transmission combo.
As far as winter driving with front wheel drives. Obviously not as confidence inspiring as AWD vehicles but they have much better traction and control than RWDs.
From what I understand the original Hybrid (trans,etc.) system in the early Ford Hybrids were engineered along with Toyota and have been improved upon by both Ford and Toyota over the years, while it may not be a direct descendant of the Toyota transmissions it should be very close. In fact if you look at test drives of the 2020 Ford Escape on YouTube (which is very close to that of the Maverick) they say its very smooth and responsive. As far a winter driving I agree that FWD is better than RWD, with a set of studless winter tires and all the traction control sytems cars have nowadays it should to fairly well in the snow, ice, etc.
 
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